IN DEPTH 5

In-depth recently has been brought down to more of a lull because I’ve gotten the hardest part (in my opinion) down which is food. Recently, I’ve focused a lot more on composting and recycling. My past mentor Mrs. Fang wasn’t as educated on this but my mom introduced me to one of her co-workers who lives alone and has a very effective recycling system going on in her household. This is a conversation I had with her.

Sanaz: What do you want to know?

This is the BLUE hat. This sets us up for the rest of our discussion and our meeting

Me: I want to be able to have a brief understanding of recycling and composting so I can start to implement these methods into my life.

Sanaz: What do you already know?

This is the WHITE hat. This question allowed me to tell her exactly what I knowledge I wanted her to help me with.

Me: From our school recycling system, I know it’s split into a couple of groups. The waste (which I’m trying to avoid), the food waste (which is what I’m composting), and the recyclables (paper, cardboard etc.) and the refundable (cans bottles etc.). That aside, I don’t know much about anything else.

Sanaz: Well, you know a little more than you think. In Port Moody, they hand out magnets and calendars that show you which things go where. The most important thing to keep in mind is recycling is more than just throwing things in the blue bin. Don’t forget to check the numbers on the back of the container

We then proceeded to talk about the difference between the numbers and what should go where.

Me: But what do I do with plastics that I can’t recycle? or what if I throw things in the wrong category?

This is the BLACK hat. It points out where I can go wrong and some flaw.

Sanaz: The most important thing is to be thorough and to trust yourself. It’s hard to transition at first because you forget to check and just throw everything in the blue bin. Every time you catch yourself making a mistake, mark it down and wait till it tallies up. Although this sounds daunting, the tallies will add up and to avoid more, you’ll start to become conscious of where you’re throwing what.

This is the GREEN hat (get it, cause I’m going green). Sanaz helped me come up with a way to keep track of my recycling rather than just shooting me down.

Sanaz: The most important thing throughout this process is that you’re always consciously trying. There’s bound to be mistakes but as long as you learn and acknowledge them, recycling and composting will be like second nature to you soon. I started being picky about my recycling, and although this sounds cheesy it’s true when a friend showed me videos of all the garbage dumps in the ocean. Change starts from one of us and I think it’s a good idea your learning this young.

This is the YELLOW hat. Sanaz showed me why she’s so involved with recycling and some of her values. Through this, we connected more. It also shows a little bit of the RED hat because she stated change starts from one person and that’s something she believes in and what keeps her going.

Sanaz was a great help to my In Depth and I’m glad she spared some of her time to help me!

Until next time!

IN DEPTH 5

In-depth recently has been brought down to more of a lull because I’ve gotten the hardest part (in my opinion) down which is food. Recently, I’ve focused a lot more on composting and recycling. My past mentor Mrs. Fang wasn’t as educated on this but my mom introduced me to one of her co-workers who lives alone and has a very effective recycling system going on in her household. This is a conversation I had with her.

Sanaz: What do you want to know?

This is the BLUE hat. This sets us up for the rest of our discussion and our meeting

Me: I want to be able to have a brief understanding of recycling and composting so I can start to implement these methods into my life.

Sanaz: What do you already know?

This is the WHITE hat. This question allowed me to tell her exactly what I knowledge I wanted her to help me with.

Me: From our school recycling system, I know it’s split into a couple of groups. The waste (which I’m trying to avoid), the food waste (which is what I’m composting), and the recyclables (paper, cardboard etc.) and the refundable (cans bottles etc.). That aside, I don’t know much about anything else.

Sanaz: Well, you know a little more than you think. In Port Moody, they hand out magnets and calendars that show you which things go where. The most important thing to keep in mind is recycling is more than just throwing things in the blue bin. Don’t forget to check the numbers on the back of the container

We then proceeded to talk about the difference between the numbers and what should go where.

Me: But what do I do with plastics that I can’t recycle? or what if I throw things in the wrong category?

This is the BLACK hat. It points out where I can go wrong and some flaw.

Sanaz: The most important thing is to be thorough and to trust yourself. It’s hard to transition at first because you forget to check and just throw everything in the blue bin. Every time you catch yourself making a mistake, mark it down and wait till it tallies up. Although this sounds daunting, the tallies will add up and to avoid more, you’ll start to become conscious of where you’re throwing what.

This is the GREEN hat (get it, cause I’m going green). Sanaz helped me come up with a way to keep track of my recycling rather than just shooting me down.

Sanaz: The most important thing throughout this process is that you’re always consciously trying. There’s bound to be mistakes but as long as you learn and acknowledge them, recycling and composting will be like second nature to you soon. I started being picky about my recycling, and although this sounds cheesy it’s true when a friend showed me videos of all the garbage dumps in the ocean. Change starts from one of us and I think it’s a good idea your learning this young.

This is the YELLOW hat. Sanaz showed me why she’s so involved with recycling and some of her values. Through this, we connected more. It also shows a little bit of the RED hat because she stated change starts from one person and that’s something she believes in and what keeps her going.

Sanaz was a great help to my In Depth and I’m glad she spared some of her time to help me!

Until next time!

IN DEPTH 4

It’s been a while! Over the past couple of days, I’ve been working on going zero waste bit by bit. I haven’t gone out for fast food in the past month and when I do go out to restaurants with my family, I always bring a container for the leftovers, so we don’t need to use the Styrofoam boxes they would usually give us.

As for meal wise, I’m still struggling a little bit. It’s hard to adapt because I can’t get my entire family on board; however, my mom has been trying her best to make meals for me so that it creates minimum waste. My mentor has been a great help even though she is really busy with her own personal life as well. She sent me a traditional meal with Chinese culture that could be adapted to zero waste and called me to walk me through it. The dish is called bianmian, translated means flour meal. The meal consists of solely flour and a variety of vegetables (and meat if you wanted!). The flour I bought was in a paper bag so it could be recycled, and I bought my vegetables with a reusable produce bag to eliminate waste. The concept behind this meal is to take protein and nutrients from all different food groups and then literally throw it in a pot. It’s easy and although it looks like mashed potatoes in a bowl with leaves, it tastes very delicious with some black pepper (which I bought and ground myself).

Speaking of my mentor, she originally said she couldn’t help me much but shes personally made time to help me out with my in-depth journey. I met at her house the other day and I showed up with a list of questions to ask her. I wanted this meeting to be more talking rather than logistics so I could understand the concept a little better.

*this meeting has been translated from Mandarin to English*

E: Although you are not zero waste, you’ve had what is arguably the most difficult part of zero waste down, would you ever consider going zero waste?

Mrs. Fang: My lifestyle food aside is heavily modern based. I’ve adapted to using things such as one-time use plastics and although I know they’re not good for the environment, with my family status they help me get through my day to day life. Right now, I wouldn’t consider going zero waste, but I would think to do it in the future once my kids are off to post-secondary and my life is a little more mellow.

E: After shopping for the materials for a recipe, I found that it can be hard and frustrating, does this ever lower your motivation to continue with the food lifestyle your carrying out?

Mrs Fang: With our current industry, it’s usually not too difficult to find the things I need for a meal. Food plan is more than choosing a recipe. It’s choosing a recipe to fit your needs, the people your feeding needs, and mother nature’s needs. Certain vegetables grow at certain times and through experience, I’ve learned when what vegetables are used. For example, I use bok choi a lot in the winter.

E: I know you’ve had some gardening and composting background, what do you recommend for someone who’s never composted before?

Mrs Fang: If you had more time, I would say start a garden! This motivates you to compost more. Because I live in an apartment, I freeze my compost, so it doesn’t start to smell. I bring my compost to a farmers market and there’s usually somewhere there where you can put it and others will bring it back to their gardens. Plus, while at the farmers market you can do some grocery shopping!

The difference between a shooting question and a fishing question is that a shooting question is the base level of a question, the original question. The fishing question breaks the question apart and digs deep. Through this process, I found that I shoot questions more than I fish for questions. I think this is because I like to get things moving and when I shoot questions it gives me more idea of a structure. In the future, I think fishing for questions will help me greatly and I will be sure to do more of it during my next meeting with my mentor. However, my shooting questions also broaden the umbrella, so I still get important and helpful information.

As time passes, I am still getting weekly emails from the goingzerowaste blog by Kathryn! It’s given me insight on some parts of zero waste such as a compostable phone case!

I learned a lot more about Mrs. Fang and food over the past week and next week I’m going to start to attack other parts of the zero-waste lifestyle.

IN DEPTH 4

It’s been a while! Over the past couple of days, I’ve been working on going zero waste bit by bit. I haven’t gone out for fast food in the past month and when I do go out to restaurants with my family, I always bring a container for the leftovers, so we don’t need to use the Styrofoam boxes they would usually give us.

As for meal wise, I’m still struggling a little bit. It’s hard to adapt because I can’t get my entire family on board; however, my mom has been trying her best to make meals for me so that it creates minimum waste. My mentor has been a great help even though she is really busy with her own personal life as well. She sent me a traditional meal with Chinese culture that could be adapted to zero waste and called me to walk me through it. The dish is called bianmian, translated means flour meal. The meal consists of solely flour and a variety of vegetables (and meat if you wanted!). The flour I bought was in a paper bag so it could be recycled, and I bought my vegetables with a reusable produce bag to eliminate waste. The concept behind this meal is to take protein and nutrients from all different food groups and then literally throw it in a pot. It’s easy and although it looks like mashed potatoes in a bowl with leaves, it tastes very delicious with some black pepper (which I bought and ground myself).

Speaking of my mentor, she originally said she couldn’t help me much but shes personally made time to help me out with my in-depth journey. I met at her house the other day and I showed up with a list of questions to ask her. I wanted this meeting to be more talking rather than logistics so I could understand the concept a little better.

*this meeting has been translated from Mandarin to English*

E: Although you are not zero waste, you’ve had what is arguably the most difficult part of zero waste down, would you ever consider going zero waste?

Mrs. Fang: My lifestyle food aside is heavily modern based. I’ve adapted to using things such as one-time use plastics and although I know they’re not good for the environment, with my family status they help me get through my day to day life. Right now, I wouldn’t consider going zero waste, but I would think to do it in the future once my kids are off to post-secondary and my life is a little more mellow.

E: After shopping for the materials for a recipe, I found that it can be hard and frustrating, does this ever lower your motivation to continue with the food lifestyle your carrying out?

Mrs Fang: With our current industry, it’s usually not too difficult to find the things I need for a meal. Food plan is more than choosing a recipe. It’s choosing a recipe to fit your needs, the people your feeding needs, and mother nature’s needs. Certain vegetables grow at certain times and through experience, I’ve learned when what vegetables are used. For example, I use bok choi a lot in the winter.

E: I know you’ve had some gardening and composting background, what do you recommend for someone who’s never composted before?

Mrs Fang: If you had more time, I would say start a garden! This motivates you to compost more. Because I live in an apartment, I freeze my compost, so it doesn’t start to smell. I bring my compost to a farmers market and there’s usually somewhere there where you can put it and others will bring it back to their gardens. Plus, while at the farmers market you can do some grocery shopping!

The difference between a shooting question and a fishing question is that a shooting question is the base level of a question, the original question. The fishing question breaks the question apart and digs deep. Through this process, I found that I shoot questions more than I fish for questions. I think this is because I like to get things moving and when I shoot questions it gives me more idea of a structure. In the future, I think fishing for questions will help me greatly and I will be sure to do more of it during my next meeting with my mentor. However, my shooting questions also broaden the umbrella, so I still get important and helpful information.

As time passes, I am still getting weekly emails from the goingzerowaste blog by Kathryn! It’s given me insight on some parts of zero waste such as a compostable phone case!

I learned a lot more about Mrs. Fang and food over the past week and next week I’m going to start to attack other parts of the zero-waste lifestyle.

In-Depth Post #5

Progress Report:

Wow…I can’t believe that this is my second to last in-depth blog post. So far, the experience has been one to remember, and I definitely plan on keeping yoga in my life. During spring break, I practiced some yoga on my own and attended a class. It was a little difficult to meet up with my mentor since she was away during the break, but I plan on seeing her again this week. Also, throughout the last four weeks, I continued my research on how yoga relaxes the mind. I wanted to focus on how it physically reduces stress and anxiety, but I also found some information on how it “spiritually” relaxes oneself. Since I presented my in-depth project with a learning center last year, I hope to share this information I learned on In-depth Night in a performance-style presentation this year. My plan is to present my yoga skills (doing yoga poses, showing a proper breathing tempo, techniques, etc.) while explaining what I have learned about reducing stress and anxiety with yoga. If I have enough time, I would prefer to talk about my learnings first, then present the yoga poses. However, I am flexible with time restrictions.

Here are some photos that I took during the first month of in-depth compared to now. Yoga helps to increase flexibility and improves posture. There is little visible progress, as you can see, but I personally feel much more comfortable doing these poses now compared to before. I won’t be explaining each pose in detail since I plan on presenting these on In-depth Night.

  1. Adho mukha svanasana (downward dog pose)

image1-2

  1. Warrior 1

image2-2

  1. Warrior 2

image3-1

  1. Trikonasana (triangle pose)

image4-1

How To Have A Beautiful Mind

Since my mentor had plans during spring break, I was unable to physically meet up with her. However, we communicated sometimes via email. I will be using one of our email “conversations” as an example for the Six Thinking Hats.

(white, red, black, yellow, green, blue)

Mentor: How is your progress? Have you been practicing at home?

[…]

Me: Yes, I have been practicing! The poses feel a lot easier now, compared to before. I was just wondering, are these poses supposed to reach a point where they aren’t difficult to achieve? Or are they supposed to remain challenging for the body, despite the many practices?

Mentor: Good question, Kailey. Because yoga is similar to stretching exercises, poses do eventually become easier when you become more flexible. If you prefer to keep up the challenge for your body, I suggest trying to increase the time each pose is held or explore different variations of the movement.

[…]

Me: I understand that many yogi (or jogi) practice yoga at Yoga Generation many times a week. As a student who isn’t able to afford that much time, what do you recommend? Is investing once per week to yoga going to be effective?

Mentor: Yoga will definitely be effective, even if you come in once per week, as long as it’s consistent. Keeping yoga in your routine can help maintain your flexibility, core, and strength.

[…]

Mentor: Great questions today! I hope I was able to help. Keep up with the practices and ask more questions if you have any.


Thank you for reading my in-depth blog post! Stay tuned for more yoga photos. 😊

In-Depth 5

Ciao! The last couple weeks of in-depth have been coming along nicely. I met up with my mentor twice, once during spring break and once after. It was hard to coordinate our schedules over spring break, as I was working full time the first week and in Ottawa the second, and her schedule was busy as well. We ended up having a two hour meeting on the Friday before I left, instead of our usual hour long meetings. It was very productive, and I ended up learning a lot of new grammar rules. We talked about the different regions of Italy and how they differ from each other; for example, each region of Italy has its own spin on Italian food, which I found very interesting. Stereotypical Italian foods such as pizza and spaghetti come from central Italy, whereas up north, they eat mostly fish, potatoes and rice. My mentor told me that she personally prefers the food down south, where tomatoes, garlic, and olives are included in most dishes.
As for the Italian language, I am right on schedule for my Italian course. I had some time while I was in Ottawa over spring break to work on the course, which was nice. I learned how to say the days of the weeks, months of the year, and nationalities. I am doing really well overall in the course, but I have been struggling with accents on the letters. The accents mean different things in Italian and in French, and since I am learning both languages, it is hard to remember which one means what. I have been working on memorizing all of the consonant sounds, and all the vowel sounds with and without accents. I am having a lot of fun in this course, and I am super excited for in-depth night!
In Edward de Bono’s How to Have a Beautiful Mind, de Bono talks about a different way of thinking called the six hats. Different coloured hats represent different ways to think about a situation. My mentor and I had a lengthy conversation about how I am doing in my Italian course currently, and what I can work on to improve. I recorded the conversation, and I highlighted the different hats used. Below is a link to the conversation I had with my mentor.

I have been working very hard on my in-depth project, and it is paying off well. I am very excited to continue developing my skills, and I am even more excited to present my learning at in-depth night!

In-Depth Post #5

The past few weeks of In-depth have been my most productive yet, and I’m not slowing down anytime soon. On my own time, I have gotten my hands on a sketchbook and I spent much of my spring break and the following week drawing up designs for looks on other people.

design-3-ocean-spotsdesign2-red-linesdesign1-flowers

 

These are a few of the designs out of the many I have, all are aimed at individual models.

Additionally, I’ve been implementing a few of my draft designs and mismatched ideas into looks on myself and my sister that have turned out beautifully. These random designs give me the opportunity to come up with new designs and ideas to record, and are a great way to work my free time into my in-depth.

sunspots-1k-galaxy-2green-freckles-1

With my mentor I learned about the proper application of base makeup like concealer and foundation and how it varies from person to person what kind to use, and how much to apply where.

before-makeup1

 

above is a picture of me after thoroughly washing my face without any makeup on.

after-concealer

And now is a picture of me with concealer applied on the left side of my face, showing the difference in colour between the two under-eyes.

after-concealer-2

And above is both under-eyes with concealer applied. You can see the slow progression of the darkness under my eyes disappearing.

 

swatch-test-concealers

The above photos show the different colours that we tried out on my face before we finally came to the right tone. In this lesson I also learned that swatching should happen on your neck, rather than your arm as your body is often a different colour than your face due to sun exposure.

I also learned the correct face-washing technique that all people (not just makeup artists) should use.

Next week we’ll be moving onto eyebrows and possibly contouring which I’m extremely excited for. I’ve really appreciated the value that my mentor places in enhancing our natural beauty rather than just putting on the same face as everyone else wearing makeup in the world. So far, our meetings are running well, except for a few scheduling mishaps and I’m excited for our next get-together.

My goal for the next few weeks is to start compiling all of miscellaneous ideas and current designs into the actual sketchbook and schedule a few get-togethers with my models. I’m enjoying In-Depth as much as ever and I’m getting more excited by the day for In-Depth night. See you in the next and final post!

 

Different hats transcription

Ft. Terri Besworth and Leah Egery-Haley

*anything in quotes is what is defined by the following hat*

Terri: “So, how do you usually prep your skin for makeup? I need some kind of starting point.” (Blue)

Me: Water? Maybe some soap, or a makeup wipe if needed. I’ve never really used primer, I haven’t seen a difference when I do.

Terri: Good, good, Yeah that’s generally a great idea, but If you’re doing this regularly you’re going to break out. “All those oils and powders get into your pores and bad skin makes for bad makeup.” (Black)

Me: Good to know, what do you generally use?

Terri: I brought a few of my face cleansers, as well as some samples.

Me: So, we’re going to go wash my face?

Terri: Absolutely! “Skincare is the most important step, so we can’t just use water!” Where’s your washroom? (White)

Me: Okay…let’s do it! Right down the hall

We go and wash my face, very thoroughly

Terri: Trust me, you are going to see a world of difference.

Me: Okay, so what’s next! My skin feels suitably clean.

Terri: “I thought we could work in increments, so by the end of our sessions you will have all of the skills you need for a full look. So like, start with the base, and then move to brows, then eyes, then lips?” (Yellow)

Me: That sounds awesome, so we start with primer then?

We do moisturizer and primer

Terri: now we get to learn how to use concealer properly. With our bases it’s important to find a good match, and coverage.

Me: Oh wonderful. That’s actually great timing, “The foundation I have right now is way too pale for me.” (Black)

Terri: Exactly! Here, I have a bunch of different types of concealer here, just your average regular concealer, a powder concealer, and a CC cream. (colour correcting cream)

Me: “So how do we find out which to use on me? Or for that matter, the other people whose makeup I’m doing?” (White)

Terri: Test them! Trial and error. It’ll take a few times but eventually you’ll get it down. “Anyway, for you I want to start with the regular concealer, because the powder does nothing but create tiny wrinkles in your face.” And you have beautiful, young skin, which we should be taking good care of. (Yellow)

Me: I can safely say I have never had my skin complimented before.

Terri: It’s true though, and that’s probably the biggest thing I want to get across to you in your project. You don’t need much. For someone like your sister I wouldn’t even use a concealer, maybe just a bit of moisturizer.

Me: “I’ve never understood that, why people will just cake on makeup, I have to do that for dance competitions and its just awful. And that can’t be good for your skin.” (Black)

Terri: That’s what makeup is for some people, just a cover-up.

Me: “But makeup should be to enhance what you already have!” (Red)

Terri: Exactly, right, right. Look

Takes concealer brush and applies tiny amount under my eyes.

Terri: That’s all you need. Here just blend that in. We’ll put the CC cream on the other side and compare them.

Me: “Are you sure I don’t need more?” You can still see my eyebags. (Green)

Terri: We’re trying to brighten your face, not erase it. That looks really good actually, this is pretty bang on your colour. Do you still want to try the CC cream? “I feel like that might be pretty on you.” (red)

Me: Why not? It just looks like it’ll be a bit more full coverage.

I apply the CC cream.

Terri: Ooooooooh. You know what I might actually like that one more. It’s just a bit more dewy. “I feel like that might be the one.” (Red)

Me: Yeah, that works really well, Wow. “Do you think I might be able to use just concealer to reshape someone’s face without really contouring? That might be a cool concept for one of my looks. This section of my face already looks higher up.” (Green)

Terri: I don’t see why you couldn’t. “Let me know if you do, that would probably be really neat.” Alright let’s get a picture, and then we can get started on eye priming. (Yellow)

Me: Nice! Thank you!

Terri: my pleasure, this is fun! I get to do makeup on someone new for a change.

 

 

 

In-Depth #5

The In-Depth project is now in full swing, and I am giving more thought about what my presentation and final project will look like. I had lots of time to practice calligraphy over Spring Break, however, my recent trip to Cuba and the school catch-up afterward has taken up so much time that I have not practiced at all for the past 1.5 weeks. So, when I met with my mentor this Sunday, I was a little rusty with my traditional Copperplate Script. Due to this, we spent some more time writing out full-size sentences and poems to practice complete Copperplate Script with connections and capital letters.

After that, I had an introduction to Modern Calligraphy. One of the main differences that I noticed between traditional and modern calligraphy is that there are not nearly as many rules surrounding letter shapes and variations. When practicing Copperplate, when I asked about what variation of a letter I should use, most of the time the answer depended on a variety of rules that were established by the previous and next letter I was writing. Letter shapes were also very strict, with a letter that did not perfectly follow the proportions and design of the script considered ‘wrong’ by traditional calligraphers. However, when asking about which shape, connection or variation of a letter I should use in Modern Calligraphy, my mentor’s usual answer was “that’s up to you. Whatever you think fits best aesthetically.” This was an interesting new concept for me that was fun and creatively challenging to explore. Nevertheless, the Modern Calligraphy script that I was exploring was her own personal script, so I didn’t have the freedoms I will have when I create my own script.

 

When meeting with my mentor, Liza Child, I was able to analyze some of our conversation with the six hats. Here is a conversation that shows all of the hats:

This example happened when I was writing the word ‘lemon’ and I didn’t know what type of L to use to start it off. There are two different variations of the lowercase letter L, one with a loop at the top and one without a loop.

Me:

“What type of L do I use here? There are two different types and I don’t know which one fits best”

Liza:

“Remember to look at the other shapes in the rest of the word and find which type of L fits the other shapes best. What L do you think would work best?”

Me, after some time to analyze the word:

“I guess the E in the lemon comes right after the L and would look a lot like a small loopy L. I think it would be better if I used the regular L without a loop to differentiate between the L and the E. It would also help complement the loop-less shapes of N and M in the lemon. Would that work?”

Liza:

“Great job! Try to use this type of analysis and figure out what type of letter to use yourself for the next word.”

White hat: I ask, “What type of L do I use here?”. I am asking a question that asks for a factual answer.

Red hat: Liza says, “Great job!”. It is Liza’s opinion and feeling that I am doing a great job. She does not back it up with any evidence.

Black hat: I ask, “Would that work?”. I am asking if this suits the design of the word. I am also giving my mentor the ability to point out places where I could be wrong.

Yellow hat: I say, “I guess the E in the lemon comes right after the L and would look a lot like a small loopy L. I think it would be better if I used the regular L without a loop to differentiate between the L and the E. It would also help complement the loop-less shapes of N and M in the lemon”. I provide multiple insights on why the non-loopy L would work better than the loopy L in the word design of ‘lemon’.

Green hat: Liza says, “What L do you think would work best?”. Liza is asking for my ideas on what L would work best in the word. She is also letting me think creatively about the design of the word so I could gain a better understanding of how word design works.

Blue hat: I say, “There are two different types and I don’t know which one fits best”. I ask for advice on which L would work best in this scenario. This shifts the focus of the conversation on word design and analysis to pick a good letter variation. It completely sets the tone and purpose for an entire conversation.

In Depth Blog Post #5

Well, The tail end of In Depth is upon me, and I only have a couple more things to make before I start to plan for In Depth! The past few weeks have been pretty productive. Over spring break I had some free time so I baked a couple of pies. I firstly made an apple pie, which was relatively straightforward except for the thatching on top, and a lemon meringue pie. The lemon meringue pie was more difficult because not only had I never made meringue before, which led me to making a mess since it took a couple tries to get right, it was  also different on top of the pie, and I baked it a little longer than I should have so the meringue was a little burnt. Although I had some struggles in baking my second pie, it provided me with some good learning experience to take into the future, especially when I start preparing for In Depth night.

I also have started watching some tutorials on making macaroons and it seems to be pretty difficult, but definitely doable. Even the professionals who are showing me how to make the macaroons mess up fairly often. I feel that it might take a couple of tries to get everything right because of the fine margin for error in preparation, but I should be able to pull off at least a decent batch of macaroons. After that I will start planning for the big night, and I’m already getting excited!

 

(I was unable to meet with Mrs. Priestly last week but I have a meeting with her this Thursday, so I will update the post with the five hats section later that day.)

In-Depth post

Time for another in-depth post! This time, me and my mentor mixed things up a bit, so let’s just get right into it!

During our last meeting, my mentor and I went kind of crazy with the song learning and started practicing tons of different songs. The idea behind this was to help me practice other chord transitions and explore more possibilities for my final project. We spent the whole night flipping through different tutorials and trying out new techniques, while also having a blast. A memorable moment was when my mentor insisted that we try learning country roads, to which I then spent some time explaining to him how “country roads” was a meme, and what memes are. It was a really engaging, somewhat difficult, but a fun meeting. We ended up covering at least 13 songs during the meeting.

As for my final presentation and goals, I have modified them to be more achievable. My initial goals were to be able to easily read music, and play the guitar comfortably, being able to hear out songs and play them without much construction. I was also expecting myself to play far more the chords and be able to somewhat do simple guitar solos. Needless to say, I was grossly overconfident. I underestimated how difficult it would be to learn how to play guitar and then practice becoming proficient at it. Although I have continuously practiced, I am just now starting to master basic chords. I have decided that by the end of this project, I want to be able to play the chords for a collection of songs, with small melodies here and there. Simple melodies that don’t last longer than 5 seconds. Narrowing my goal down will let me stress a bit less about my progress, and focus more on my final presentation, which is now more achievable than before.

How to Have a beautiful mind:

Due to our relatively relaxed meeting, we didn’t actually work that hard on practicing my current songs and therefore didn’t have long conversations where different hats were used to help my learning. However, I can use brief moments within the meeting to exemplify the different hats.

White hat:

We used this when trying to find chord progressions for certain songs. We would both do some research, compare sources, then given the information that we had, we developed our own chord progression through trial and error of the different sources given.

Red Hat:

Used when we decided to break off of chord progression charts for some select songs such as “Elanor Rigby”, in this case, we played different chords, went with what felt right, and bounced off of each other until it felt like we had created our own chord progression without the help of external sources.

Black hat wasn’t used much unless you consider skipping certain songs after deciding they are too difficult for me to attempt a situation where the black hat is used.

Yellow hat not used

Green hat:

Helped me while I was trying to learn a melody section in let it be. I was trying different methods of the plucking section, and my mentor helped me practice the routine and decide which one sounded the best.

Blue hat not really used, as I said, it was an unstructured meeting.

I’m happy to say that with these new goals set in place, I’m now ready to power through to the end of in-depth, and achieve my new plans!