Desmos Graph

link to graph

Over the course of the past week, I created my own math version of Kermit the Frog on Desmos. I chose to do Kermit because I wanted to an image that had defined lines but also with a level of challenge. The image of Kermit I choose had a lot of curved lines but also was two dimensional meaning that I could still complete it within the given time frame and my level of expertise. The biggest challenge I ran into was finding a way to use functions to do curves that were a little irregular. At the beginning, I wanted to do a parabola that was rotated 90 degrees and no matter how many numbers I changed the equation y=x^2 wouldn’t work. However, two days later, I accidentally punched in x=y^2 and found that the parabola rotated. This might not be the most mathematically ‘aha’ moment, but as soon as I punched it in, I realized how simple the solution is. I used this equation a lot in the future.

Another challenge I came across was not knowing where to start. I wanted to start somewhere easy but I realized making art out of math isn’t exactly the easiest thing. As I continued with this project, I found out it’s only gets easier as I start to work on it more. I learned through experience and found different ways to create curved lines and how to create restrictions that helped me build the image. I tried to do inequalities over the weekend, but no matter how I moved it, as soon as I zoomed out the inequality would disappear so I took them out. This is definitely something I want to figure out how to fix in the future. As well as, when I first started, I couldn’t seem to get the lines to match up at all. After asking around, I found out that if I put my curser on the line, it tells me the exact points to the third decimal and that helped a lot. This seems really small but it made the rest of my project smoother.

And so to the actual functions I used:

Quadratic Equation: y=x^2 OR x=y^2

I primarily used this function because this allowed me to make curves big and small as well as create a loop at the bottom that I used on features like the side of Kermit’s face and the curved edges on his hand. I mainly stretched the parabola to make it larger. I also used horizontal and vertical translations and reflections to move it to the spot that I wanted it to be.

Square Root Function: y=squareroot x OR x=squareroot y

I used this function when I needed a slight subtle curve; for example on his forearms. I used translations left and right to get it to the spot I desired as well as stretching and compressing to get it to be the size that I wanted it to be.

Reciprocal function: y=1/x

I used this function for more prominent large curves such as his mouth.

Linear Equation: y=mx+b

I used this equation to connect all the curves together. The image I chose wasn’t facing forward; the entire image was a little tilted so I used a straight line to connect multiple curves that wouldn’t quite fit together. I changed the slopes and the intercepts to get it where I want.

Circle: x^2+y^2=r^2

Although this is a relation and not a function, I used this equation a lot. I used it for the eyes and to make curves that I couldn’t quite make with the other equations. I used restrictions (both x and y restrictions) to cut it to the curve that I wanted.

Through this project, I learned a lot about graphing and functions but I think I do need to study them a bit more even though I made nearly a hundred of them. For the majority of this project, I would input the equation I wanted and then fiddle with the numbers until it fit. This project helped me wrap my mind around the concept but I need to apply this new knowledge on smaller, relevant numbers.

John A. Macdonald Essay

John A Macdonald: The Founding Father of Canada, Worthy of the Name

Canada prides itself in holding a strong sense of community, compassion, and diversity. What Canada can’t pride itself in is understanding where our history comes from. Majority of Canadians are unaware of the hardships and battles that we went through at one point in time. Therefore, when an idea that seems out of perspective and from a separate lens, it spreads like wild fire. John A. Macdonald is our founding father. As a leader, he took the highs and lows of the beginning years of this nation. The choices he made at that time, such as residential schools, might seem wrong now but back in that time and era was what the common moral was and “while Macdonald did make mistakes, so did Canadians collectively” (“National Post”). His actions and willpower are what brought this large land mass, stretching from sea to sea to sea together. Albeit Macdonald’s historical beliefs and contributions to Canadian growth he should remain a part of the public sphere.

Arguably one of Macdonald’s greatest accomplishments as a politician and a leader was his work with the Canadian Pacific Railway. Today, many say that this railway caused controversy and oppressed the Chinese at that time but when stripped bare, this railway is what brought Canada together and we can thank Macdonald for this. During his generation, politicians focused mainly on “economic bonds rather than cultural bridges”. (“Open Text BC”) Macdonald proposed this idea to his audience and promised British Columbia this railway so they would join with Canada. British Columbia at the time was part British and part America. This is significant because “Macdonald never deviated from the purpose of his public life, which was to make certain that Canada did not become America” (Gwyn). The railway created a secure way see to it that the Americans didn’t try to conquer them because it created a stronger sense of law and economy in Canada. He ensured the people that this railway would connect the East to the West which created easier trade and allowing for more resources within its own borders. This appealed to the majority of Canadians at the time because it involved intercolonial trading rather than working with other countries. More within Canada, this form of transportation allowed expansion and growth within the Prairies. The railroad opened up settlement by transporting necessities like coal and grain. John A Macdonald’s determination and wit gave Canada the chance to utilise all of its vast resources and help one another within communities.

On the contrary, one might say that John A. MacDonald mistreated people through the process of making this railroad, just like he mistreated the indigenous people with residential schools. Many argue for his monuments and statues getting taken down because they serve as a reminder of all the hardships minority groups went through during the first years of Canada. However, during that ear of time “the average British Columbian saw Asians as a threat to racial purity. And almost everybody was fine with the expectation that the native way of life would soon be extinct”. (Symons) Politicians at this time all had this narrow mindset, but John A. Macdonald was ahead of his time. Although he didn’t see eye to eye with the people today on racism and reconciliation with the First Nations, He is “the first leader in the world to attempt to extend the vote to women” (Gwyn). In 1883, Macdonald tried to pass a bill into parliament that gives the Dominion franchise to unmarried women and widows. Unfortunately, the bill was not passed and Macdonald’s vision of allowing women to vote didn’t follow through during his time as Prime Minister, but it did speed up the process and women were welcomed into the democracy in 1916. Due to him taking a risk and expressing an unpopular opinion, he was deemed a progressive thinker. He was someone who’s best interest was to move Canada forward as a whole. John A. Macdonald knew what the views and perspectives of the people at that time were. He used his clever and quick intuition to shape Canada for the people back then and the people of today even though it doesn’t line up with the morals of our current era.

Overtime, our country has come to respect all that step on the land. The government and the people are trying to reconcile with the people we’ve hurt in the past. However, we must keep in mind that historical beliefs are vastly different from the beliefs we hold today. Taking John A. Macdonald’s name away from history is equivalent to erasing the accomplishments he’s made as well. The work he did with fixing our economy, connecting the east and west and setting up the foundation to advance us as a whole should be recognized and extoled to the public eye. In the end, it’s valuable to take a step back and ask why these people, the people that change the way we live today are seen. As time passes, change comes with it, but we should know who progressed us to where we are now. John A. Macdonald created the bonds between us, created our sense of unity, and created a platform for us to grow on. Because of his actions, we can respectfully question the reasons why we look up to historical figures today. Canada hold a strong sense of unity, all thanks to our founding father worthy of his name, John A. Macdonald.

 

SOURCES:

 

Belshaw, J. D. (2016, May 17). Canadian History: Post-Confederation. Retrieved from https://opentextbc.ca/postconfederation/chapter/4-2-john-a-macdonalds-canada/

 

Gwyn, J. (2012, November). Canada’s Father Figure.

 

Hopper, T. (2015, January 24). Sure, John A. Macdonald was a racist, colonizer and misogynist – but so were most Canadians back then. Retrieved from https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/sure-john-a-macdonald-was-was-a-racist-colonizer-and-misogynist-but-so-were-most-canadians-back-then

 

Symons, T. (n.d.). John A. Macdonald: A Founder and Builder.

 

Canadian Pacific Railway. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/canadian-pacific-railway

 

Facing Sir John A. Macdonald’s Legacy. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/facing-sir-john-a-macdonalds-legacy

 

 

LAST IN-DEPTH POST FOR FOREVER (which is kinda crazy)

I can’t believe this is my last in-depth post!

I’ve gained a lot of valuable skills and learned a bunch of new concepts over the past four months. I took a different approach this year because rather than learning a skill I was changing the way I was living (which arguably could be a skill from certain perspectives). I’m glad I chose to do this because the experience I’ve had this year is vastly different than last year. Over the past four weeks, I’ve been perfecting the skills I’ve learned before and starting to make little transitions such as in beauty routines and hygiene and transportation.

Chapter 9: Concepts

Because my in depth has so many more components rather than just one set skill, I’ve had to reach out to a lot of mentors for help. Recently, I reached out to my mentor from last year who helped me with sewing. She taught me a lot about sewing, designing, and creating. She wasn’t able to meet up with me for our schedules wouldn’t line up, but she did have time to call me.

We talked about the concept of reusing. Although this sounds self explanatory for my project is to reduce my environmental foot print, breaking down this word creates a huge impact in my perspective. She talked to me about how reusing isnt just using the same thing over and over again, its taking something old and turning it into something new; whether that’s physically altering it, giving it to someone else for a second life, or looking at it through a different lens. For example, an old t-shirt can be turned into cotton swabs to take off my makeup. Its as simple as cutting out circles and sewing them together. When she told me this change, I was taken back. How could something so simple not have ever crossed my mind? I can reuse these cotton swabs as well, just throw it in the wash! Similarly, cutting up old towels to make reusable paper towels!

Another concept that’s been reoccurring in my project is change. Change, change, change that seems to be all ive been doing. Changing my diet, changing my form of transportation, changing the way I buy things. I must admit, it did get frustuarting sometimes. Especially when I was changing the way I ate. I am a very impulsive buyer when it comes to food. The amount of profit places like 7/11 have gotten off of me from candy and drinks is insane. It took me a while before I convinced myself that I didn’t NEED those things and in fact they were damaging to both me and the environment. It helped when my mentors would tell me how it was hard for them to change too. Sanaz (who helped me with recycling) told me that at first, she didn’t know a single thing about recycling, but it just takes a little bit of will power and knowledge to make a huge difference. I’ve learned that change isnt always huge, but the change you make could drastically impact how you live.

Chapter 10: Alternatives

The way that I’ve been attacking my project is by learning it skill by skill and learning it through transition time. My mentors have all taught me to take things slow and to try to learn a new habit. Its hard to suddenly drop everything and change. For food, Ms. Fang has given me the alternative of rather than dropping all meats, limit it to a certain amount per day or per week. She also suggested to finish what’s in the pantry before moving on. I’ve read online the same things with makeup. Finish everything you have first before you start to make a transition.

If I were to have taken a different route, I could have gone cold turkey. I could have cut all waste out of my life at once. This would have been a lot harder, but I would of seen results faster. Another alternative I could of done is simply cutting plastics out of my life. This might seem the same but cutting plastics out means no recycling at all which would have posed more of a challenge. Overall, there were a lot of alternate routes I could have chosen, but I’m glad I did it the way I did.

Learning center!

This one was a little hard to think of.  I originally wanted to create a video that shows all the milestones during my project; however, the microphone of my phone is broken meaning I don’t have a device I could record it on. Creating a tri-fold would have been contradictory to the point because in a sense it would create waste. So, after hours of pondering I’ve come to the conclusion that rather than creating a display of what I’ve learned, I will be what I’ve learned. Ill bring in all the new things I’ve made from old things such as make up wipes, reusable straws, even Tupperware containers just to show the audience how easy it is to make a simple switch. If possible, I will ask to bring out the new bin system to my learning center to show that with a little extra thought it could do a great deal. (Ill check to use the one in front of the cafeteria because I think that one’s empty). As well as, I will bring links to resources that people can use if they want to learn more. I will be the main source of information to share my personal experience with everyone and hopefully give people more insight on what its like.

 

 

Canadian Biography Check in

“If heaven is a good place and preferable to the earth, why is murdering good people bad?” (32)

As someone who isn’t religious, this quote caught my eye. I don’t know much about Christianity, but I do know things like heaven and hell. I had to stop and read this quote a couple of times before I fully grasped what it meant. It altered my lens on how I saw religion and showed me that philosophies even when simplified can have multiple more layers of depth and meaning behind it. Although at first glance this passage seems sadistic and morbid, the more I think about it, the more real it gets. This connects to our discussions in class where we talked about how western culture is more about the individual whereas eastern cultures value more of a whole. Some eastern countries are so bound to their idea of belief and religion they don’t see outside of it. However, someone with a western point of view, might question this idea and put a spin on it, creating controversy and sometimes it leads to situations as tragic and horrific as suicide bombings. We don’t know the thoughts of the people behind these incidents, but thoughts like these could be running through their heads. (this is not saying ALL eastern countries and ALL western countries have the same outlook, this is merely generalized).

This passage was inserted near the beginning of the book. The context behind it is that she had one of these thoughts with her friends in her teen ages. During this time, Canada was strongly religious meaning Atwood was raised in a religious environment. From what we’ve learned before, I know it was hard for anyone to speak up or speak out during this time. She was told to be quiet and to keep thoughts like that to herself at the time. The values of Canada back then were strongly one sided and anyone who went against it wasn’t necessarily punished but was told to just follow along and not to ask questions. This text also shows that, now people can talk about these things, people can start to ask questions that might never have an answer and have a healthy discussion about it. Canadians have the right to practice any religion or culture they have and to inquire and learn about others.

“Six children, five who lived. / she never said anything about those births and the one dead; / her mouth closed on a pain / that could neither be told nor ignored.” (49)

I found this passage interesting because the poetic flow and the way she used her words caught my eye. She formed them in such a way where its so simplistic yet the power behind the text draws a sophisticated image. I had to go back and read this passage over and over before I fully understood it. Margaret Atwood has a way with words where she writes these grim poems and pieces of literature but with more analyzing it creates more layers. The idea behind this quote is that her maternal grandmother never talked about the pain. It was never discussed in her family how difficult some things are and they tend to only look at the good things, neglecting everything else. This bit reminded me of the one-child policy. The ideas are completely different but they both touch on post partum and how mothers of that era had underlying issues that weren’t always surfaced.

The views of Canada at that time were that the women were to raise the children, teach them life skills while the men went out and provided for the family. At that time, this was completely normal. Mothers were supposed to be the caring figures, being calm and soothing the children, unable to speak up about their own concerns. Margaret Atwood’s maternal grandmother watched five of her children grow old and one die. This incident must have a toll on a persons mental and physical well being, but she couldn’t speak up because she knew as soon as she told it, it would change everyone’s outlook on her. The only foreseeable solution at the time was to stay quiet, to keep it to herself unless someone asked. The views on situations like this have changed today in Canada. Canada is relatively a pro choice society. We hear the voices of mothers and their stories, both good and bad. We can provide resources for abortions or miscarriages.

“Throughout these years, Atwood’s commitment to her craft and vocation, as well as that sheer momentum she managed to maintain were daunting to witness […] it was as if, because she had chosen literature and the arts over the sciences as her family might expected, shea had to justify herself.” (75)

I’ve never been in these shoes myself, but I connected with this part of the book. My parents support me in everything I do and always tell me I have the choice and if I am happy, they are more than willing to support me. But I still feel the underlying pressure to go into a field of science, or medicine, or something that will guarantee me money in the future. This isn’t my parents’ fault; it isn’t anyone’s fault. It’s just the values that have been held in Chinese culture and the stereotypes that I’ve heard so often that they’ve subconsciously stuck with me. From what I’ve read, Margaret Atwood’s family was a supportive family. They grew up tight and always went on trips together. Yet, even with all that past connection, she still felt the need to prove herself even when no one in her family was doubting her.

This passage shows that during this era in Canada, making money and sustaining yourself still wasn’t easy. Atwood chose to follow her passion rather than a ‘set’ future and she had to carry more burden just to show that she wouldn’t fail. She worked harder than ever and got lost in the vortex of her own thought. It represents how big of an impact social influence has on people back then and now. Students these days have a lot more freedom with what they want to do in the future and are given a plethora of opportunities; yet I still know so many people who want to be doctors or lawyers, not because it’s a passion, but because its ‘guaranteed’ money.

“Land of the septic tank,

Home of the speedboat,

Where still the four-wheel drive

Wanders at will,

Blue lake and tacky shore,

I will return once more:

Vroom-diddy-vroom-vroom

Vroom-diddy-vroom-vroom

Vroo-OO-oo-oom” (80)

 

This poem stood out amongst her other ones. All of the other bits of literature I’ve read in the book up to this point were grim and sent shivers down my spine. This one was a little more playful and lighter on its toes. I read it and related it back to my everyday life. I thought of the gorgeous waters and mountains of BC (even though she wrote this about the east coast). The way the words were used could be used to describe any forested area, but it still hit home. It reminded me of all the trips I took with my family to Chilliwack and Banff.

 

This passage shows the value of home. It shows how important it was back then to hold land and property. The places where one grew up was the place that they felt most at peace, especially because this was an era after a war so the idea of having property and home was soothing to all. It also plays off of how during this time, a lot of people’s childhoods were spent in the wilderness. It was spent helping parents sustain their lives, farming etc. Now, Canadian values lies in home is where the heart is. So many people in Canada aren’t born in Canada yet they call it home. The beautiful scenery and long drives are what bring people comfort, just like before.

 

“We ladies were no threat. There was a joke among the woman students that the best way to pass your roals was to stuff a pillow up your dress.” (93)

I was stunned by this passage because it was written about her time at Harvard. It talks about how no one ever found any of the women on campus intimidating, but as soon as they were pregnant, everything changes. The professors would feel bad not passing them because it was during this time that views were shifting, and women were slowly starting to get more rights. This connects to any concept where a new demographic gets new rights. For example, lowering the voting age. Many politicians were terrified of this idea, thinking it would destroy the demographic system they had at hand. Pierre Trudeau took a step forward and at frit things were rocky but eventually it evened out for the better. However, there was a slip of time where people feared the idea of this change. People fear the concept of things not going as routine, hence when not controlled it can lead to catastrophes such as the American Revolution.

I stated mot of the values in the paragraph above but to summarize, the values at that time were that education could be accessed by all, but there was still differentiation between women and men. People at that time had equal outcome but not necessarily equal opportunity. Women were still looked at as caregivers, just disguised as someone seeking education. However, today in Canada the playing field has been somewhat evened out. Women who are pregnant seeking for education aren’t looked at any differently than anyone else in the class.

THEME

One can take all the information and knowledge their environment has given them and turn it into a completely different outcome than others were thinking.

From what I’ve read so far, although there were hints that Margaret Atwood was a talented writer very little thought she would carry it out as a career, herself included. There was a slump in her education where she felt like her words meant nothing. However, she took the ideologies of her environment and picked herself up and pursued what she wanted to do. She didn’t turn on any of the values or morals her family held, she merely just shifted them in a different direction. I can apply this to my own life because it shows me that things are constantly in change and I’ll never fully know what I want to do until I’m doing it. I’m not betraying my family or my friends if I do something that doesn’t appeal to them. In the long run, it’s my life and if what I do makes me feel like a better person, I should have that simple right and carry on.

 

IN DEPTH 5

In-depth recently has been brought down to more of a lull because I’ve gotten the hardest part (in my opinion) down which is food. Recently, I’ve focused a lot more on composting and recycling. My past mentor Mrs. Fang wasn’t as educated on this but my mom introduced me to one of her co-workers who lives alone and has a very effective recycling system going on in her household. This is a conversation I had with her.

Sanaz: What do you want to know?

This is the BLUE hat. This sets us up for the rest of our discussion and our meeting

Me: I want to be able to have a brief understanding of recycling and composting so I can start to implement these methods into my life.

Sanaz: What do you already know?

This is the WHITE hat. This question allowed me to tell her exactly what I knowledge I wanted her to help me with.

Me: From our school recycling system, I know it’s split into a couple of groups. The waste (which I’m trying to avoid), the food waste (which is what I’m composting), and the recyclables (paper, cardboard etc.) and the refundable (cans bottles etc.). That aside, I don’t know much about anything else.

Sanaz: Well, you know a little more than you think. In Port Moody, they hand out magnets and calendars that show you which things go where. The most important thing to keep in mind is recycling is more than just throwing things in the blue bin. Don’t forget to check the numbers on the back of the container

We then proceeded to talk about the difference between the numbers and what should go where.

Me: But what do I do with plastics that I can’t recycle? or what if I throw things in the wrong category?

This is the BLACK hat. It points out where I can go wrong and some flaw.

Sanaz: The most important thing is to be thorough and to trust yourself. It’s hard to transition at first because you forget to check and just throw everything in the blue bin. Every time you catch yourself making a mistake, mark it down and wait till it tallies up. Although this sounds daunting, the tallies will add up and to avoid more, you’ll start to become conscious of where you’re throwing what.

This is the GREEN hat (get it, cause I’m going green). Sanaz helped me come up with a way to keep track of my recycling rather than just shooting me down.

Sanaz: The most important thing throughout this process is that you’re always consciously trying. There’s bound to be mistakes but as long as you learn and acknowledge them, recycling and composting will be like second nature to you soon. I started being picky about my recycling, and although this sounds cheesy it’s true when a friend showed me videos of all the garbage dumps in the ocean. Change starts from one of us and I think it’s a good idea your learning this young.

This is the YELLOW hat. Sanaz showed me why she’s so involved with recycling and some of her values. Through this, we connected more. It also shows a little bit of the RED hat because she stated change starts from one person and that’s something she believes in and what keeps her going.

Sanaz was a great help to my In Depth and I’m glad she spared some of her time to help me!

Until next time!

IN DEPTH 5

In-depth recently has been brought down to more of a lull because I’ve gotten the hardest part (in my opinion) down which is food. Recently, I’ve focused a lot more on composting and recycling. My past mentor Mrs. Fang wasn’t as educated on this but my mom introduced me to one of her co-workers who lives alone and has a very effective recycling system going on in her household. This is a conversation I had with her.

Sanaz: What do you want to know?

This is the BLUE hat. This sets us up for the rest of our discussion and our meeting

Me: I want to be able to have a brief understanding of recycling and composting so I can start to implement these methods into my life.

Sanaz: What do you already know?

This is the WHITE hat. This question allowed me to tell her exactly what I knowledge I wanted her to help me with.

Me: From our school recycling system, I know it’s split into a couple of groups. The waste (which I’m trying to avoid), the food waste (which is what I’m composting), and the recyclables (paper, cardboard etc.) and the refundable (cans bottles etc.). That aside, I don’t know much about anything else.

Sanaz: Well, you know a little more than you think. In Port Moody, they hand out magnets and calendars that show you which things go where. The most important thing to keep in mind is recycling is more than just throwing things in the blue bin. Don’t forget to check the numbers on the back of the container

We then proceeded to talk about the difference between the numbers and what should go where.

Me: But what do I do with plastics that I can’t recycle? or what if I throw things in the wrong category?

This is the BLACK hat. It points out where I can go wrong and some flaw.

Sanaz: The most important thing is to be thorough and to trust yourself. It’s hard to transition at first because you forget to check and just throw everything in the blue bin. Every time you catch yourself making a mistake, mark it down and wait till it tallies up. Although this sounds daunting, the tallies will add up and to avoid more, you’ll start to become conscious of where you’re throwing what.

This is the GREEN hat (get it, cause I’m going green). Sanaz helped me come up with a way to keep track of my recycling rather than just shooting me down.

Sanaz: The most important thing throughout this process is that you’re always consciously trying. There’s bound to be mistakes but as long as you learn and acknowledge them, recycling and composting will be like second nature to you soon. I started being picky about my recycling, and although this sounds cheesy it’s true when a friend showed me videos of all the garbage dumps in the ocean. Change starts from one of us and I think it’s a good idea your learning this young.

This is the YELLOW hat. Sanaz showed me why she’s so involved with recycling and some of her values. Through this, we connected more. It also shows a little bit of the RED hat because she stated change starts from one person and that’s something she believes in and what keeps her going.

Sanaz was a great help to my In Depth and I’m glad she spared some of her time to help me!

Until next time!

IN DEPTH 4

It’s been a while! Over the past couple of days, I’ve been working on going zero waste bit by bit. I haven’t gone out for fast food in the past month and when I do go out to restaurants with my family, I always bring a container for the leftovers, so we don’t need to use the Styrofoam boxes they would usually give us.

As for meal wise, I’m still struggling a little bit. It’s hard to adapt because I can’t get my entire family on board; however, my mom has been trying her best to make meals for me so that it creates minimum waste. My mentor has been a great help even though she is really busy with her own personal life as well. She sent me a traditional meal with Chinese culture that could be adapted to zero waste and called me to walk me through it. The dish is called bianmian, translated means flour meal. The meal consists of solely flour and a variety of vegetables (and meat if you wanted!). The flour I bought was in a paper bag so it could be recycled, and I bought my vegetables with a reusable produce bag to eliminate waste. The concept behind this meal is to take protein and nutrients from all different food groups and then literally throw it in a pot. It’s easy and although it looks like mashed potatoes in a bowl with leaves, it tastes very delicious with some black pepper (which I bought and ground myself).

Speaking of my mentor, she originally said she couldn’t help me much but shes personally made time to help me out with my in-depth journey. I met at her house the other day and I showed up with a list of questions to ask her. I wanted this meeting to be more talking rather than logistics so I could understand the concept a little better.

*this meeting has been translated from Mandarin to English*

E: Although you are not zero waste, you’ve had what is arguably the most difficult part of zero waste down, would you ever consider going zero waste?

Mrs. Fang: My lifestyle food aside is heavily modern based. I’ve adapted to using things such as one-time use plastics and although I know they’re not good for the environment, with my family status they help me get through my day to day life. Right now, I wouldn’t consider going zero waste, but I would think to do it in the future once my kids are off to post-secondary and my life is a little more mellow.

E: After shopping for the materials for a recipe, I found that it can be hard and frustrating, does this ever lower your motivation to continue with the food lifestyle your carrying out?

Mrs Fang: With our current industry, it’s usually not too difficult to find the things I need for a meal. Food plan is more than choosing a recipe. It’s choosing a recipe to fit your needs, the people your feeding needs, and mother nature’s needs. Certain vegetables grow at certain times and through experience, I’ve learned when what vegetables are used. For example, I use bok choi a lot in the winter.

E: I know you’ve had some gardening and composting background, what do you recommend for someone who’s never composted before?

Mrs Fang: If you had more time, I would say start a garden! This motivates you to compost more. Because I live in an apartment, I freeze my compost, so it doesn’t start to smell. I bring my compost to a farmers market and there’s usually somewhere there where you can put it and others will bring it back to their gardens. Plus, while at the farmers market you can do some grocery shopping!

The difference between a shooting question and a fishing question is that a shooting question is the base level of a question, the original question. The fishing question breaks the question apart and digs deep. Through this process, I found that I shoot questions more than I fish for questions. I think this is because I like to get things moving and when I shoot questions it gives me more idea of a structure. In the future, I think fishing for questions will help me greatly and I will be sure to do more of it during my next meeting with my mentor. However, my shooting questions also broaden the umbrella, so I still get important and helpful information.

As time passes, I am still getting weekly emails from the goingzerowaste blog by Kathryn! It’s given me insight on some parts of zero waste such as a compostable phone case!

I learned a lot more about Mrs. Fang and food over the past week and next week I’m going to start to attack other parts of the zero-waste lifestyle.

IN DEPTH 4

It’s been a while! Over the past couple of days, I’ve been working on going zero waste bit by bit. I haven’t gone out for fast food in the past month and when I do go out to restaurants with my family, I always bring a container for the leftovers, so we don’t need to use the Styrofoam boxes they would usually give us.

As for meal wise, I’m still struggling a little bit. It’s hard to adapt because I can’t get my entire family on board; however, my mom has been trying her best to make meals for me so that it creates minimum waste. My mentor has been a great help even though she is really busy with her own personal life as well. She sent me a traditional meal with Chinese culture that could be adapted to zero waste and called me to walk me through it. The dish is called bianmian, translated means flour meal. The meal consists of solely flour and a variety of vegetables (and meat if you wanted!). The flour I bought was in a paper bag so it could be recycled, and I bought my vegetables with a reusable produce bag to eliminate waste. The concept behind this meal is to take protein and nutrients from all different food groups and then literally throw it in a pot. It’s easy and although it looks like mashed potatoes in a bowl with leaves, it tastes very delicious with some black pepper (which I bought and ground myself).

Speaking of my mentor, she originally said she couldn’t help me much but shes personally made time to help me out with my in-depth journey. I met at her house the other day and I showed up with a list of questions to ask her. I wanted this meeting to be more talking rather than logistics so I could understand the concept a little better.

*this meeting has been translated from Mandarin to English*

E: Although you are not zero waste, you’ve had what is arguably the most difficult part of zero waste down, would you ever consider going zero waste?

Mrs. Fang: My lifestyle food aside is heavily modern based. I’ve adapted to using things such as one-time use plastics and although I know they’re not good for the environment, with my family status they help me get through my day to day life. Right now, I wouldn’t consider going zero waste, but I would think to do it in the future once my kids are off to post-secondary and my life is a little more mellow.

E: After shopping for the materials for a recipe, I found that it can be hard and frustrating, does this ever lower your motivation to continue with the food lifestyle your carrying out?

Mrs Fang: With our current industry, it’s usually not too difficult to find the things I need for a meal. Food plan is more than choosing a recipe. It’s choosing a recipe to fit your needs, the people your feeding needs, and mother nature’s needs. Certain vegetables grow at certain times and through experience, I’ve learned when what vegetables are used. For example, I use bok choi a lot in the winter.

E: I know you’ve had some gardening and composting background, what do you recommend for someone who’s never composted before?

Mrs Fang: If you had more time, I would say start a garden! This motivates you to compost more. Because I live in an apartment, I freeze my compost, so it doesn’t start to smell. I bring my compost to a farmers market and there’s usually somewhere there where you can put it and others will bring it back to their gardens. Plus, while at the farmers market you can do some grocery shopping!

The difference between a shooting question and a fishing question is that a shooting question is the base level of a question, the original question. The fishing question breaks the question apart and digs deep. Through this process, I found that I shoot questions more than I fish for questions. I think this is because I like to get things moving and when I shoot questions it gives me more idea of a structure. In the future, I think fishing for questions will help me greatly and I will be sure to do more of it during my next meeting with my mentor. However, my shooting questions also broaden the umbrella, so I still get important and helpful information.

As time passes, I am still getting weekly emails from the goingzerowaste blog by Kathryn! It’s given me insight on some parts of zero waste such as a compostable phone case!

I learned a lot more about Mrs. Fang and food over the past week and next week I’m going to start to attack other parts of the zero-waste lifestyle.

Canada: a country or a nation

Canada with all its differences aside holds a sense of unity, bringing us together as a country with many nations. We as a whole are too wide spread and have too many different morals and values to be able to stand as a nation. One of Canada’s key virtues is holding a sense of cultures from around the world due to how openhearted we are. Many people are thankful that “being Canadian is like being […] big family” (Macdonald, 2016) because it gives them a sense of belonging that they couldn’t get in their home countries. We have such a diverse demographic within our borders. The concept of post-nationalism means that the individual nations lose their importance and identity. Canada’s nation holds a large part in our identity. We have the “French-speaking province of Quebec already constitutes one distinctive nation, as do the 50-plus First Nations spread across the country” (The Guardian, 2017) plus all of the immigrants and refugees. With each person crossing Canada’s borders and calling it home, they bring in a fraction of culture with them to build towards the bigger picture, what consists of Canadian identity. However, this concept of Canadian identity differs for all. Canada, in terms of land mass, is the third biggest countries. We touch three separate oceans. On this land lies so many different nations that its impossible for us to be one whole nation. There’s a difference between patriotism and nationalism. In this scenario “patriotism is what makes us behave unselfishly” (Hannan, 2016). All Canadians follow a set of laws which allow them to live freely, practicing their own customs and religion. Which means we have such a diverse community its impossible for us to all be on the same page unless its on a rule book. To build off of that “Healthy nationalism encourages diverse people to cooperate” (Vancouver Sun, 2016), so Trudeau’s idea might be more obscured than it sounds.Therefore, although Canada respects and welcomes people of all different nations, we ourselves are not a nation and merely borders of a country that encompass different cultures.

Romeo and Juliet Act ll: Critical Response

Based on our readings so far, do you agree or disagree hat Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is one of “‘infatuated children’ engaging in ‘puppy love’”? why or why not?

William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet tells the tale of two-star cross lovers willing to go to great lengths to be with one another. It sheds light on love and grace and touches many hearts. However, some, such as Ledingham, believe that the affection between the two young teens is mere “puppy love”. And although this tale is a tragedy of love told people around the world, there is still hard evidence to show that the love between Romeo and Juliet is infatuated.  At the beginning of the play, we are introduced to Romeo’s love interest at the time, Rosaline. Romeo drones on and on about how she is “rich in beauty” (1.1.212). His love for Rosaline is so strong that “[he] live dead that live to tell it now” (1.1.220-221). Romeo pours buckets of emotions into his words, convincing the audience that Rosaline, although a nun, will forever be the love of his life. As the play carries on Romeo stays persistent to Rosaline until he sees Juliet at the Capulet party where he questions whether “[his] heart love till now” (1.5.52). He makes this judgment solely based off a glance at her across the room. He makes the decision that Rosaline is no longer important to him and that Juliet “teaches the torches to burn bright” off an impulse choice (1.5.44) Moreover Juliet plays a large role in the puppy love as well. Although she starts off as a cautious grounded individual, slowly we start to see parts of Juliet that show she hasn’t had enough life experience to truly understand what love beholds. When Paris requests to marry Juliet through Capulet he states that “is yet a stranger in the world” and hasn’t experienced much outside the Capulet walls (2.1.8). After one night with Romeo, she claims that “[she’ll] no longer be a Capulet” if it means she gets to be by Romeo’s side (2.2.36). She becomes quick to make rash decisions and is willing to throw away her family and name. The two young strong-willed individuals don’t understand the harsh reality and although as the play unfolds opinions could differentiate, as of now it is merely puppy love and fantasy behavior.

To what extent is Kulich’s argument that Romeo and Juliet should not be viewed as children effective, or even historically accurate?

Although Kulich’s argument that Romeo and Juliet was a realistic tragedy seems true at first after more research one can see that it’s not as up to par as one may think. The first red flag in her article is that she explains the transition between a child to an adult like a jump as if as soon the child is out of school they are considered an adult. An adult is matured and fully developed (Merriam Webster). Through the play, there are multiple instances where Capulet refers to Juliet as his child. Capulet states that “she hath not seen the change of fourteen years” which infers that Juliet is merely thirteen years old going onto fourteen (1.2.8). We usually associated growth with puberty during the teen ages of one’s life and a girl tends to go through puberty between ages 10-14 (Medline). This means that Juliet still isn’t fully developed as a person and as for Romeo, puberty happens even later. As well as, during the Elizabethan era, it was rare for families to only have one child meaning that if the Capulets and the Montagues would be protective of them giving them only the best education (Elizabethan Era). Kulich states that “relatively few privileged children went to secondary school”. The two families both hold high wealth and power which would mean Romeo and Juliet are still in school and learning with debunks Kulich’s statement. Moreover, Kulich draws it to seem that marriage at a young age during this time was common; however, the average age of marriage during the setting of this play is 27 years old, an age neither Romeo or Juliet are anywhere near (The Age of Marriage). The evidence provided shows that Kulich’s theory is not historically accurate.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adult

https://medlineplus.gov/puberty.html

http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-education.htm

http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/SLT/society/family/marriage.html#juliet.