DOL: Canada in the Roaring 20s

Image result for 1920s

The end of World War I brought about a crackling, commoving event known as The Roaring 20s. The Roaring 20’s was a time of change, and a time for shifting autonomy. As Canada recognized its place in the world as an independent country, so did the people within it. For example, during the war, women were hired for work, as jobs in aiding war interests (such as manufacturing war goods) were abundant. After the war, returning soldiers found themselves in a position where a number of jobs were no longer available due to women having entered the workforce. Women were expected to give up their jobs to the returning soldiers. Many working women of the time were against this idea. Instead, they called for social change, for social autonomy for women. Through working these jobs, they learned their right to independence and began to ask for it, battling a social norm of being obedient, docile wives and mothers. They wanted the right for greater educational and job opportunities, as well as the right to vote. Many men and some more traditional women opposed the movement. This social struggle during the early 1920’s, caused a major shift in the realm of a woman’s place in society and promoted women’s social autonomy in Canada.

Image result for 1920s suffragettes canadians(Newfoundland and Labrador suffragettes)

In modern day, Canada’s media continues to be centralized around American media, movies, music, and art. The difference between Canadian and American media culture is unclear. Canada competes with America’s loud voice in order to create its own cultural and social autonomy apart from its neighbor below. Few Canadian artists and social influencers are known, and music and movies watched in Canada are majorly American-produced.

The technological advancements in the Roaring 20s contributed to the coagulation, rather than the separation, of American and Canadian cultures. Technology such as radios improved, and their prices dropped, meaning more Canadians could buy them. Image result for 1920s radio broadcastHowever, 80 percent of radio programs Canadians listened to were produced in the USA. Similar problems arose in other types of media such as magazines and movies, where Canadian media outlets competed with stronger American ones. Additionally, American companies invested in “branch plants”, operations located in Canada but owned by the American companies in order to bring American products to Canadians and avoid transportation costs. Canadians became familiar with American social culture. This is an example of how the growth of Canadian social autonomy was restrained during this time.

It was not only Canada and USA’s media that was brought closer together; political and economic ties were strengthened as well. After the war, Canada and USA’s trade grew while Canada’s trade with Britain declined. By 1925, USA became Canada’s biggest trading partner. By creating a wider separation from itself and Britain, Canada began to explore what it meant to be more independent in its decisions about trade, growing Canada’s economic autonomy.

“The Canadian economy benefited from the strong US economy, The Americans needed Canada’s natural resources to manufacture products, such as newspapers. But most manufactured goods flowed the other way – from the United States to Canada (211).” – Creating Canada: A History 1914-present

 

This strong bond between the US economy and Canadian economy is a relevant point today, because currently Trump wants to put tariffs on some Canadian goods such as aluminum and steel, disrupting the harmonious relationship that USA and Canada’s economy have had for so long. While Trump makes his decisions, he should consider the history and reality of strong relationships between Canada and the United States.

Canadian Economist: “We are so screwed” … “This is like ...

As European countries began to recover from the effects of war, the demand for Canadian products grew. Canada became a major wheat explorer. Canada became more independent in international trade, further improving its economical autonomy.

Internally, Canada was experiencing economical change was well. More jobs in producing consumer goods such as cars, radios, and telephones emerged. Before the war, over 50 percent of Canadians lived in rural areas. Workers moved from these rural areas to cities, where jobs were available. These cities grew as their population increased. This resulted in urbanization of more areas in Canada. The political influence and autonomy of these urban areas began to grow, and the power of rural areas decreased a naturally produced system of representation by population.

Image result for 1920s industry

Industries developed techniques for mass production, allowing for more production. Since jobs were increasing, and the economy was booming. As a result, industries began marketing goods like electric toasters, sewing machines, and fashionable clothing towards Canadians.

Image result for 1920s inventionsImage result for 1920s fashion

They ran mass ad campaigns on billboards, radio, the news, in magazines. They mailed catalogues all over the country in order to encourage Canadians to spend. Canadians became less self-sufficient due to these technological advancements – before they sewed their clothes, now they could buy them. Canada’s economy and technology pushed social change, and therefore autonomy, because people could purchase more and be freer in self-expression. However, they may not have realized that their actions had sparked the beginnings of dominating consumerism in the country, which is a lifestyle that continues today. Canadians’ collective shift towards a new social structure defined their change in social and economical autonomy.

Image result for 1920s consumerism

Overall, the Roaring 20s weren’t considered “roaring” for no reason. It was a jam-packed age of innovation, relations, and growth. It was the puberty of consumerism. The Roaring 20s shouted, yelled, caused such a ruckus across history that its effects continue to thrum through the veins of Canada today.

 

Sources:

Flaherty, Peter. Creating Canada a History – 1914 to the Present: Teacher’s Resource. McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 2010.

https://www.history.com/topics/roaring-twenties

http://www.canadahistoryproject.ca/1920s/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roaring_Twenties

Is Trudeau Laurier’s true sucessor?

geometric-venn-diagram

https://trudeaumetre.polimeter.org/

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/sir-wilfrid-laurier/

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/justin-trudeau/

http://www.morrisclasses.com/uploads/9/2/6/1/92619078/horizons_chapter_7_part_1.pdf

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/ns-prof-trudeau-sunny-ways-1.3280693

http://www.morrisclasses.com/uploads/9/2/6/1/92619078/horizons_chapter_7_part_2.pdf

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/laurier-not-trudeau-defined-canada/article1336626/

Socials DOL – Confederation Argument

I, Edward Barron Chandler, can only see one future. In the palms of that future stands the power of Confederation.

I was invited to the 1864 Charlottetown Conference, where I was educated on our governmental issues, and I have become convinced that Confederation is an inevitable move. However, I must push for terms that favour New Brunswick. In order to have my people’s voices heard, Maritime Union should happen. New Brunswick in particular needs Confederation because of our U.S. border, so defense is highly important.

Though I think that Confederation is where our future lies, provincial rights are of utmost importance and I suggest some fair compromises. Confederation will only be effective is the central government has clearly defined powers, and provinces have their own as well. MacDonald is mistaken – power to local governments will not result in another American Civil War, but will ensure that each province has its own rights. Additionally, I suggest that “Rep by Pop” does not happen because our colony has a smaller population in comparison to the rest of what may become new Canada. New Brunswick deserves just as much power as out bigger neighbors.

I also believe that Confederation should move forward because I support the construction of a railway from sea to sea. This will allow New Brunswick, alongside other small colonies, to flourish outside of our usual trade zones and help the economy, especially our business in timber, forestry, pulp and paper, fisheries, and floriculture. It will also improve communications among the land we share.

I am a spokesman of my people, and with my voice, it is only right to speak for what is best.

 

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/edward-barron-chandler/

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/new-brunswick-and-confederation/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Barron_Chandler

https://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/confederation/023001-4000.15-e.html

In Depth Post #6 – The Conclusion (but not really)

This year’s in-depth has really been an adventure.

I wrote a first draft of a novel for the first time, was able to secure a mentor who is a professional author, and made giant leaps in my understanding of the book/publishing industry as a whole.

Although I cannot say I have written a novel, which would have been unrealistic anyway due to the short time frame, I have written more of a novel than I ever have. In fact, I have even begun revising and creating a second draft of the novel.

Something important I learned from my experience is that always being excited about something is hard. Our passions and interests tend to fluctuate, and so did my interest in the story I was writing.

Here’s a excrept that I plan to read. After this, I will provide a ‘blurb’ about the book to the audience to make them want to read the book.

“Have you ever felt like, when you’re breathing, you’re not breathing at all? It’s like someone carved out a hole right outta your lungs and when you breathe, instead of getting any air in you, it’s like, whoosh, in through your mouth and whoosh out of your chest and it never reaches your lungs and your diaphragm never contracts and there’s no oxygen in your blood.

Technically, I should be dead, but somehow I am not dead, which leads me to the conclusion that, I am, in fact, filling myself with hyperboles and exaggeration and dramatization, and really I am breathing but I can’t feel the air going anything at all.

I wonder if I smelled everyone in this waiting area, I could smell every part of the world.

I squeeze my full suitcase in between my skinny knees and try not to think about the empty, because my dumb butt neglected the fact that humans can’t survive off of nothing and forgot to bring food. And, naturally, when the human body is deprived of food, that’s all the human body can think about.

It’s a lot more interesting than thinking about how I got here.”

Overall, I think my project was a success. To be honest, I’ve been reading on what I previously wrote and I cannot stop feeling embarrassed about it, even though only my mentor has seen it. It really gives me perspective on how my thoughts and ideas change over such a short amount of time and forced me to face my own writing.

At first I struggled with figuring out how to encapsulate my project on In-Depth night. How could I communicate to visitors how much time and energy I spent on m writing if all I had to show was something unfinished and would just look like a stack of paper?

Then it hit me – I could present a booktalk.

My plan for my In-Depth performance is to pitch my ‘book’ to the audience, much like the way an author would pitch a book to a publisher. I want to make a cover for a pseudo book for my presentation.

This format of presenting has its pros and cons,  but I think it would make more sense because I have done learning centres for my past in-depths and I really wanted to branch out this year and think of a creative way to present, rather than making yet another tri-fold.

I’m excited to try something new this year and present what I’ve been working on every day for the past months.

Canadian Biography quotes

I’m currently reading David Lam: A Biography by Reginald H. Roy. The following are 5 passages from the text that I considered impactful.

 

1. “It was a torture to study English and to study a lot of things, which, to my young mind, I considered totally irrelevant. We learned about Glasgow, Edinburgh and the Midlands – what the heck for? We learned about the Clyde, shipbuilding, London, the Thames. I kept asking myself, what for? We studied English and European history but never touched Asian history or geography. We studied like crazy and every day I asked – what for? It was really hard work , just transforming a person from totally Chinese educational and cultural background into an English-style one” (13).

  1. What I find interesting about this quote is how it challenges “English-style” educations systems being imparted on people of other descents. I was born to two Chinese parents, and I am a first generation immigrant to Canada. My initial education and cultural lifestyle was heavily influenced by the Chinese culture. As a young Chinese person in a English-style/Eurocentric education system, I have found myself pondering similar topics in the past. I have learned a great deal about Canadian and American histories, but I have scarcely touched on topics that I can proudly call my own history.
  2. This passage touches on one of the problems with “English-style” education systems, which is something that Canada primarily uses in its public education system. It reveals how it can feel irrelevant or uncomfortable to be a person of non-European descent learning in such an environment. I believe that Eurocentric education systems can be improved upon by becoming more inclusive of all world cultures and histories.

2.”I don’t have an ox. I have to use a horse” (24).

  1. This quote is a metaphor for David’s father asking him to help be a leader in the family, since the oldest son in the family, Daniel, was not present. It references the fact that a farmer uses an ox to plow the field, and would not usually use a horse, but since he doesn’t have an “ox”, he must use his second choice, the “horse”. I found it interesting because I have never heard this saying before for having to settle for second choice.
  2. In the biography, this is not an insight expressed by a Canadian; However, it was told to a man who would become Canadian and bring the influence of these words to his new nationality. It reveals the importance of being flexible and working with what you have, which is a value that we can hold presently.

3.”It was hard, but when there is no other way to handle it, you just let it go. When everyone is suffering the same, it’s okay” (28).

  1. This sentence is moving because it really highlights the resilience of humans in suffering. When people

4.”Everyone was lacking except enthusiasm and innovation” (32-33).

  1. This sentence refers to a time in Lam’s life during war when he was living at a school and community without much technology – it was rural, and there was no running water. No one had much. What I found interesting about this passage is how it reflects human resilience in tough times, working together to even when there is nothing.
  2. This can refer to Canadian resilience through hard times.

5.”For someone from a different culture […] it’s not easy to handle at times. How friendly is friendly, how warm is warm? How much is hot air and how much is not? AS a waiter, it was the best education about people and society” (54).

  1. The understanding of navigating through a different culture is very familiar to me, as the people closest to me, and I, have had to deal with it. Growing up in a non-Canadian household and being introduced to western values and customs is always a difficult change, which can go undervalued.
  2. This shows the acceptance of places like Canada of people from different cultures who experience culture shock when moving to a new place. Canada is known for being multicultural and welcoming, and that is reflected in how new people are accepted.

Canadian Biography quotes

I’m currently reading David Lam: A Biography by Reginald H. Roy. The following are 5 passages from the text that I considered impactful.

 

1. “It was a torture to study English and to study a lot of things, which, to my young mind, I considered totally irrelevant. We learned about Glasgow, Edinburgh and the Midlands – what the heck for? We learned about the Clyde, shipbuilding, London, the Thames. I kept asking myself, what for? We studied English and European history but never touched Asian history or geography. We studied like crazy and every day I asked – what for? It was really hard work , just transforming a person from totally Chinese educational and cultural background into an English-style one” (13).

  1. What I find interesting about this quote is how it challenges “English-style” educations systems being imparted on people of other descents. I was born to two Chinese parents, and I am a first generation immigrant to Canada. My initial education and cultural lifestyle was heavily influenced by the Chinese culture. As a young Chinese person in a English-style/Eurocentric education system, I have found myself pondering similar topics in the past. I have learned a great deal about Canadian and American histories, but I have scarcely touched on topics that I can proudly call my own history.
  2. This passage touches on one of the problems with “English-style” education systems, which is something that Canada primarily uses in its public education system. It reveals how it can feel irrelevant or uncomfortable to be a person of non-European descent learning in such an environment. I believe that Eurocentric education systems can be improved upon by becoming more inclusive of all world cultures and histories.

2.”I don’t have an ox. I have to use a horse” (24).

  1. This quote is a metaphor for David’s father asking him to help be a leader in the family, since the oldest son in the family, Daniel, was not present. It references the fact that a farmer uses an ox to plow the field, and would not usually use a horse, but since he doesn’t have an “ox”, he must use his second choice, the “horse”. I found it interesting because I have never heard this saying before for having to settle for second choice.
  2. In the biography, this is not an insight expressed by a Canadian; However, it was told to a man who would become Canadian and bring the influence of these words to his new nationality. It reveals the importance of being flexible and working with what you have, which is a value that we can hold presently.

3.”It was hard, but when there is no other way to handle it, you just let it go. When everyone is suffering the same, it’s okay” (28).

  1. This sentence is moving because it really highlights the resilience of humans in suffering. When people

4.”Everyone was lacking except enthusiasm and innovation” (32-33).

  1. This sentence refers to a time in Lam’s life during war when he was living at a school and community without much technology – it was rural, and there was no running water. No one had much. What I found interesting about this passage is how it reflects human resilience in tough times, working together to even when there is nothing.
  2. This can refer to Canadian resilience through hard times.

5.”For someone from a different culture […] it’s not easy to handle at times. How friendly is friendly, how warm is warm? How much is hot air and how much is not? AS a waiter, it was the best education about people and society” (54).

  1. The understanding of navigating through a different culture is very familiar to me, as the people closest to me, and I, have had to deal with it. Growing up in a non-Canadian household and being introduced to western values and customs is always a difficult change, which can go undervalued.
  2. This shows the acceptance of places like Canada of people from different cultures who experience culture shock when moving to a new place. Canada is known for being multicultural and welcoming, and that is reflected in how new people are accepted.

JAM Mini Essay – Erasure is not the Answer

It is often easier to forget out mistakes than to address them, but the erasure of errors does nothing to rectify them. Due to controversy surrounding Macdonald’s past actions according to our current values, some believe that those who have instigated ethical wrongdoing, such as Macdonald, should no longer be honored as statues, have public schools names after them, and removed from the public sphere.However, others disagree and think that John A. Macdonald should continue to be acknowledged for his achievements. While people believe that John A. MacDonald, like many historical figures, had his shortcomings, his name and likeness should not be removed from the public sphere  because doing so would weaken the public’s ability to understand, recognize, and remember the roots of racism in Canada.

 

MacDonald’s removal from the public sphere would be detrimental to the public’s understanding on Canada’s history. Though MacDonald’s legacy is “not as an honoured father of confederacy, but one of shame, one of hatred and white supremacy, one of genocide”, which is demonstrated by his involvement in his role in implementing residential schools, in which as many as 6,000 children died, and acts such as the Indian Act (which imposed government control over Native people), some still view him as a distinguished Father of Confederation (Symons). The ‘public sphere’ is “a social space in which different opinions are expressed, problems of general concern are discussed, and and collective solutions are developed communicatively” (oxfordbibliographies.com). The removal of his name from public schools would not be the complete removal of MacDonald’s name from the public sphere. If his name was removed from this social space, it would be a disrespectful disregard for those who suffered as a result of his actions because his impacts would not be discussed . The public would be under-educated on how he impacted Canadian history, negatively and positively.

The fight for John A. MacDonald’s name and likeness being removed from the public sphere includes the argument that MacDonald perpetuated European superiority in Canada and built radical measures against minority groups, a prominent one being the Chinese. One example of MacDonald’s European supremacist views was that he proposed to the House of Commons that “Chinamen” should not be able to vote on the grounds that they were “foreigners” and that “The Chinese has no British instincts or British feelings or aspirations” (Stanley). When he did this, he demeaned the validity of the Chinese community. This is precisely the reason that John A. MacDonald’s cannot be removed from the public sphere as these roots of racism and prejudice must be remembered in order to honor the struggle of Chinese-Canadians. “Canadian historiography underplays the significance of racisms in shaping Canada, representing them to be individual moral failings or expressions of the prejudices of the age, all the inevitable result of difference, their devastating consequences largely ignored”, which is why MacDonald’s misdoings must continue to be discussed  (Stanley). MacDonald’s role in shaping racism in Canada should be understood in order for the public to understand why prejudices occurred in Canada and realize the struggles of racism. be more clear in your statements.We must hold those responsible accountable, instead of erasing them. The correct course of action in the case of MacDonald’s statues is not to revoke mistakes of the past, but to sharpen our own vision. His statues and likenesses should be treated as reminders of history for those who suffered and as memorials, not monuments.

 

Critics believe that John A. MacDonald’s name and likeness be removed from the public sphere, whilst their opponents disagree and consider him a hero and founder of Canada. In truth, John A. MacDonald’s name and likeness cannot be removed from the public sphere because his contributions to Canada’s past and the multitude of reasons for inequality today must be recognized and never ignored. Never should perpetrators of past pain be quietly let go; they should be identified for our struggles today.

 

In Depth Post #5

I met with my mentor this week at Lougheed Mall. This was a bit nerve-wracking for me because recently I’ve really been trying to write without boundaries. Some of the stuff I put in my document was really embarrassing because I didn’t allow myself to erase anything, including an illiterate paragraph where I typed in all caps about how frustrated I was with the story. I intended to erase this, but forgot, so I;m sure that my mentor saw it.

During this meeting, we didn’t really discuss my writing itself. This meeting was mainly focusing on learning about publishing and the literature industry. During our meetings, I took handwritten notes to reread and recall what we talked about.

Firstly, I started the conversation by talking about my writing. I was almost done my first draft, which is truly and honestly a mess filled with holes. (Like, think crater-sized.) I realized through my process that I wanted to move a subplot into the role of a main plot, and move the main plot into a subplot. My mentor was understanding and supportive; he said that it’s OK to abandon a story.

We talked about the process of publishing (traditionally, not self-publishing). I’m learning a bit about my mentor’s life as an authour. My mentor currently had three books in submission for publishing, which, according to my mentor, can take three months to a year to receive communication.

Publishing, like any other industry, is dominated by a few major companies. These are referred to as “The Big Six”, but since the merger of Penguin and Random HOuse, had been reduced to the Big Five. They include:

  • Georg von Hotzbrinck Publishing Group/Macmillan
  • Hachette
  • HarperCollins
  • Penguin Books
  • Random House
  • Simon & Schuster

If you take a few books off of any store bookshelf, you’re likely to see one of these names.

There are a few mid-size publishers that are well known as well, such as Orca Book Publishers, Lorimer Publishers, and Pyjama Press.

Most publishers only take agents nowadays, meaning that an author’s book must be submitted by an agent to a publishing company for it to be considered. The author must pay the agent, and the agent usually receives a percentage of the profits. When submitting a book, publishers usually require a summary, a chapter summary, and a query letter, which is like a cover letter for the book (why it’s good, why it should be published).

I have always been a cynic of the music industry, especially after past interest and research into celebrity marketing, management, and the nasty world of PR and publicity. I never thought the same (ugly) society would apply to books Until now, I did not have a good idea of that the publishing business was like. I saw books as art, as something shared with the world. The truth is, the publishing industry is just that – an industry. A business.

I’m not saying that this is bad, but it does take away some of the magic of books, knowing that some books end up on the shelves for different reasons that you’d expect.

Like the music industry, the modern book industry is all about marketing. Often publishers will pay for the tools needed to market a book, but the author will be the one in charge of creating that publicity. Nowadays, publishers don’t just care about the book. They care about how well the authour will be able to sell the book. An authour cannot simply be a writer anymore; they should be able to plan events, travel (on book tours), and be savvy on social media. A good example of this is the influx of books written by YouTubers that were released at the peak of YouTuber influence. (I’m not saying that all these books were badly written, necessarily, but… Let’s just say that some people are more articulate on camera than in words.)

Books that are published are not the best material that could be sent out into the world, it’s who’s the best package. The publishing industry, like the fast fashion or entertainment industry, follows trends. This is something called “commercial fiction”. When Harry Potter was published, the fantasy genre blew up. When The Hunger Games became popular, we saw the future-dystopia-tragic-teen story industry blow up. Think Divergent and The Maze Runner. My mentor put it this way: There is usually one original, genuine article, but then a bunch of “copycats” follow along, trying to make a profit.

To reinforce and accelerate my learning, I can go to publishing websites and read online about their submission guidelines and read a few books published by them.

This is why he told me that when you get an idea, jump on it. There is probably someone writing the same story as you – it’s like a race to get published first. For example. my mentor wrote a book about werewolves versus vampires that was published just months before Twilight came out. If he had been published a few months later, he would have been regarded as another copycat.

I asked him how long it usually takes him to write a book. For him it takes about a year, but he said that writing has no time limit. It can take as long as it needs, which is nice to hear because I’m considering revising my whole story (oops).

My mentor provided my learning opportunities this week by suggesting a few goals for me:

  • Find a publisher that would fit my writing.
  • Read a similar book.
  • Pretend my mentor is a publisher and submit a summary and query letter to him.

We talked about in-depth night, and my mentor suggested creating a “mock-up” book to display, which I think I’m going to do.

To wrap up, these have been a productive few weeks in my learning process. I’m still struggling with writing, but I have an idea of what I want to complete for in-depth night.

Canada Independent Investigation – the Filles du Roi

A. Outline the focus of  your inquiry and provide background knowledge. Why is this an important and significant questions to ask about the past? Provide evidence from primary and secondary sources.

 

Inquiry Question: How did the arrival of the “Filles du Roi” or “King’s Daughter’s” impact today’s French-Canadian society?

The Filles du Roi were a group of about 800 women who were among the poorest in France. They were sponsored by the King Louis XIV to immigrate to Canada (New France) between 1663-1673 in order to correct the gender imbalance and populate the land.

Image result for filles du roi

(image source: canadianencyclopedia.ca)

This is an important and significant question to ask about the past because the French-Canadian culture, as well as the population, that is apparent Canada were largely due to the arrival and settlement of these women. Without the Filles du Roi, New France’s population may have dwindled or died off due to the lack of females in the land. Canada would have have the thriving Francophone community it has today.

It is difficult to find primary sources of information on these women. as CBC.ca says: “There are very few first-hand accounts of the lives of the Filles du Roi. Few of them could read or write. Their histories have largely been told by subsequent generations. That said, one thing we know with absolute certainty: the Quebec we know today owes a lot to the fortitude of these incredibly tough women.”

 

Cause and Consequence: Why did your researched questions happen the way they did and what were the consequences?

In order to gain control of the fur trade along the St. Lawrence river, New France required a higher population. Their British competitors had a more open policy of who could arrive to the colonies from Britain, and had about 18 times as many settlers as New France. New France had a ban on Protestants coming to the new land.

Britain’s population grew while New France, which had one woman to every six men, was not.

Jean Talon, the Intendant of the colony, delevoped a plan with King Louis XIV to import women to the colony to marry male settlers. Most of the women were poor, many were orphaned. These women would become the Filles du Roi or “Daughters of the King”. One in ten of the women died on the journey, but around 800 survived to settle in New France.

Image result for filles du roi

(image source: fillesduroi.org)

 

Ethical Judgement: Is what happened right and fair by the values and standards of the time? How about from our current values and standards? Explain.

What happened was right and fair, according to the standards of the time. A majority of the women were relocated form a desolate, poor, orphaned life to one that held potential spouses, families, and a longer, richer one. Many were given a dowry of 50 livres (equivalent to around $1,000 today).

However, if this event were to be proposed today, there may be much more controversy surrounding it. In current Canadian culture, it may seem ethically unsound to pay people to pair off in such a calculated fashion. The proposition also perpetuates heteronormativity, and does not take into account possible LGBT members from both sides. In the 21st century in Canada, people generally marry for more complicated reasons than just reproduction. The model of the Filles du Roi puts the people involved in danger of abusive or unhealthy relationships that are difficult to escape. Additionally, one in ten women died on the voyage from France to New France (Canada). This would be frowned upon today – it’s expected that one people get on a ship, they should be able to get off the other side. There were fatalities in this event that would be considered tragic today.

The voyage reminded me of other minority groups in history who have been subjected to unsafe journeys across the sea in order to fulfill the desires of others. One example is the transatlantic slave trade, which also resulted in fatalities.  Though the quest and destiny of the Filles du Roi was different than that of slaves, I see a connection between their predicaments. I do not believe that the formation of the Filles du Roi would be looked upon as a good decision if it were to happen today.

Image result for slave trade

(image source: Encyclopedia Britannica)

B. What conclusions can you make about your questions based on the research your conducted?

 

Two thirds of the current French-Canadian population’s ancestry can be traced back to the Filles du Roi. in 2011, approximately 7.3 million people reported French as their native tongue in Canada, 7.9  spoke French at home on a regular basis. If we consider those 7.3 million people as the French-Canadian population, it would mean that 4.86 million French-Canadians can be traced back to the Filles du Roi. The 2016 population of Canada was 36.29 million. 4.86 million is about a seventh of the population – a noteworthy amount.

The arrival of the Filles du Roi impacted not only the current French-Canadian society, but Canadian society as a whole. After their arrival, the country experienced the biggest population growth in Canadian history. Thanks to them, the society was able to continue to grow and thrive. The Filles du Roi were an integral part of the growth of Canada’s people and their legacy should not and cannot be excluded from history.

 

 

Sources:

 

(Secondary source) La Societe de Filles du Roi et soldats du Carignan: https://fillesduroi.org/

(Secondary source) CBC: http://www.cbc.ca/2017/canadathestoryofus/most-french-canadians-are-descended-from-these-800-women-1.4029699

(Secondary source) The Canadian Encyclopedia: http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/filles-du-roi/

(Seconadry source) New France: https://fillesduroiofnewfrance.weebly.com/filles-du-roi.html

Social Blog Post: Document of Learning

e·vent

əˈvent/
noun
  1. a thing that happens, especially one of importance.
    “one of the main political events of the late 20th century”
    • a planned public or social occasion.
      “events to raise money for charity”
      synonyms: occurrencehappening, proceeding, incidentaffaircircumstanceoccasionphenomenonMor

       

     

For my Wheels of Revolution event, I chose a planned public or social occasion rather than an unplanned event to highlight how events intentionally impact social evolution and how it can unexpectedly impact it as well.

A Wheel of Revolution is a social evolution process that usually follows a S.T.E.P. or P.E.S.T order. The letters stand for Social, Technological, Economical, and Political.

The event I chose is Eco Fashion Week. Eco Fashion week is a fashion showcase highlighting fashion that is sustainable and innovative.

Eco Fashion Week produces first international event in ...

(Unfortunately, this event will no longer be happening in the future due to lack of financial support.) Currently, the way that Canadians treat fashion and clothing is not sustainable. For example, it takes 2,700 litres of water to make one cotton shirt (according to http://www.wri.org), which is about enough water for one person to drink for 2 1/2 years.

“Polyester production for textiles released about 706 billion kg (1.5 trillion pounds) of greenhouse gases in 2015, the equivalent of 185 coal-fired power plants’ annual emissions” (Drew, Yehounme, 2017).

Fashion Sustainability - Trusted Clothes

For more information, visit this website.

Here is what Eco Fashion Week identifies themselves as:

“Established in Vancouver, BC in 2010, Eco Fashion Week (EFW) has successfully showcased 11 editions featuring over 150 of designers and stylists from around the globe. As a not-for-profit organization, EFW aims to present the solutions and innovations working to develop a more responsible fashion industry. The sustainable fashion spectrum is diverse and multifaceted, as it considers the environment, the working conditions, the supply chain as well as responsible consumption practices. At EFW, we call this the Eco Recipe. In short, an Eco Recipe is individualistic and speaks to the ways companies, brands and individuals practice sustainability” (http://ecofashion-week.com/index.php/about/).

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Here is a mind map I made of my notes on the event/movement. You can see that I used grey lines to interconnect my ideas. I used Green for my titles, black for my main points, and grey for my significance/evidence. I wish that the Social Evolution Wheel included Environmental, because my event was highly based around that.

Since Environmental is not on our list, it can be said that Eco Fashion Week’ ‘social revolution wheel’ began as a Social movement. With our earth’s health increasingly at risk, fashion and sustainably sourced clothing has become a big conversation. Eco Fashion week is the world’s largest sustainable fashion event. This event shows that society finds this cause important and will lead to change. Holding Eco Fashion week resulted in raised awareness in consumers, making them conscious of their purchasing decisions. This creates a social movement towards sustainability in clothing and fashion. It connects designers/producers and consumers with similar interests and goals.

This connects to technology, because having conscious and interested consumers means that designers such as Anian MFG, Bellatoni, Sonam Dubal, etc., have more financial backing and inclination to research and use sustainable textiles and focus on fiber sourcing which lessens environmental harm. This leads to waste diversion.

5 reasons why you should care about Eco Fashion Week ...

(Design by Sonan Dubal)

Fiber sourcing leads to job sourcing, which impacting the Economy. Ethical brands provide jobs and opportunities to struggling groups, or just people in general. Even though product pries may rise, workers are treated fairly and the quality of goods will likely be higher.

LUSH factory photo tour: Inside the Willy Wonka factory of ...

(image source: businessinsider.com)

A good example of this is Lush, a cosmetic and bath store that has somewhat steep prices but all their goods are carefully handmade from fine ingredients. Retail leaders will feel inclined to produce in a more conscious way and potentially reduce waste of water and use non damaging textiles. Eco-friendly businesses such as Lush (bath products), Method (household cleaning products), and Pantagonia (outdoor equipment) receive support and influence other companies to do the same. Eco Fashion Week involves fashion and industry retail leaders and key stakeholders, including big names like Lululemon. This affects the rise and fall of consumption of brands and clothes. It affects brand integrity, or the way that consumers perceive a company.

Brand integrity connects to Politics. Brands are “people of power”. Once people of power feel an obligation to protect the environment, potential new laws, regulations, and rules may be set in place to increase sustainability. For example, many grocery stores are beginning to charge 5 cents per plastic bag, which encourages shoppers to bring their own and help reduce plastic waste. Thanks to events and movements like Eco Fashion Week, people in politics or a position of power are beginning to move towards a more sustainable way of living.

My event follows the same trajectory as intentionally created events, such as the Grammy Awards. Society decides a song is popular, much like society decides that they care about sustainable fashion. This moves to Technology, meaning that artists produce more songs using the same technology as the popular songs. They create new sound and music that they think will be catchy, much like how designers harness new textiles to see what is “catchy” or fashionable. Consumers buy the product, which in the Grammy’s case is music and in Eco Fashion Week, the fashion. Finally, Politics step in. People vote for the best song of the year or the album of the year, or another award. It’s an election for the best music of the year. As you can see, the Grammys also follow a S.T.E.P wheel.

(image source: gackhollywood.com)

The Eco Fashion Week S.T.E.P. wheel represents justice for the planet, sustainable designers, and we, the consumers. It represents the justice of being knowledgeable about what we consume and how to protect your world. It currently remains unresolved as climate change is a battle we still fight today. I hope the revolution for environmental sustainability stays strong. I believe the ‘consequences’ of Eco Fashion Week are highly positive to everyone involved, from designers, to companies, to consumers because it means a healthier Earth for everyone.

(P.S./Irrelevant comment: Looking back at everything I do in English and Science, I think that if it weren’t for art, I’d want to become an environmental scientist or activist. Veganism! Coconut Oil! Tempeh! Kale! Vote with your dollars! Shop sustainably! Save the bees! Save the world!)