April 23rd, 1945

My dearest Michael,

I am writing this letter with the deepest and most solemn intentions. What I wish to tell you cannot be confined into words, and I hope you take my words, but most importantly my feelings to heart. I wish to tell you a bit about my life, and the cause that I fought for, and with all my mind I hope I can live through tomorrow to see you at home.

It is now the April of 1945, and we have been at war for the past 5 years. I serve now in the RCN, on HMCS Brantford, and I know firsthand the perilous conditions we face every single day on the Atlantic. What a miserable, rotten hopeless life, an Atlantic so rough it seems impossible that a sailor can continue to take this unending pounding and still remain in one piece. Over the course of the battle so far, more than 3,600 Canadian sailors lost their lives in the seas, and more than 752 air men passed away. Canada and our allies, the USN, RN and FFN, stand together in the fight, but no one is safe from the U-boats, and nowhere can we find refuge. Stretching from the cold water of Labrador Sea or the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the waters sailed by the Home Fleet, the allies have been racing to transport materials to Europe, escorting convoys of more than a dozen ships. In the longest battle of the War, the Battle of the Atlantic, we have suffered more than 4000 allied ship loses so far, and millions of tonnages of goods. The imminent victory to the Allied Forces did not come at a small cost.

Canadians are peacekeepers and non-aggressors for the most part, but we are also loyalists to our allies. I have said this in disregard for the French, which you know I am not a part of. I believe that they have made a mistake by going against our war efforts like conscription, and their recalcitrant attitude hinders our support to the rightful cause. Anglophones like me cannot understand their decisions now, but at least they cheer with us when we secure a U-boat kill. The success of the Navy and Air Force united Canada for short bursts, but looking back at the Great War, I doubt its longevity. I do hope that in your time the French Canadians will stand at the same front as the English, and Canada can stand united in a time of global conflict.

The war is affecting Canada on many fronts, many dear to your own family’s lives. Your parents, who are young children at this time, live conservatively with limited supplies. Even the dress of women changed to a simpler outfit. As result of millions willingly contributing to the war effort, Canada has built more than a million tonnages of cargo ships, and more than 200 worships. This has been called “remarkable,” “astonishing” and “magnificent” by an English official, and Canadian strength and economic stability is just starting to shine through the horizon. Canadians are also starting to get together to hear the news and bond with their neighbors, and new job opportunities industrialized many towns. Through the French may realize that their voices are not being considered in this country, bringing some degree of political separation, the war so far has changed Canada’s economy and social identities for the better. This, in no way, mean that the War is beneficial to us, and you must remember that one life lost is one too many. We can only look back blessed that we were not hit as hard as others are.

The Battle of the Atlantic is the turning point of the entire War, even if you take my personal bias out. Without the support of hundreds of Canadian warships, Britain and the Soviet Union could not have continued fighting, and we would have lost the war in Europe. Canadians entered the War with less than twenty serviceable warships, and the number now exceeds three hundred. Canadians are now respected worldwide for their valiant fighting and their industrial power, and we are gaining speed economically and politically. The industries that were built up will continue to power Canada, and our international relations are never stronger. I see a bright future for Canada, one in which it is considered an equal to other world powers.

This is both a testament and a memoir from a sailor, documenting the experiences of the terrible War. I write in a perilous situation, facing a last stand from a Wolfsrudel of 15. I write this so that you will know how War changes everything, from the perspective of one who has gone through it all. I hope you now know about

 

THE DAILY SUN – JUNE 5, 1866

Dear citizens and voters of New Brunswick,

As your Premier for the greater part of the past 5 years, I would like to thank you, the hardworking and steadfast people along the banks of St. John, for supporting me with your voices and ideas. I stand firmly behind the ideas of a confederation, a union of the British North American colonies, and a Dominion of Canada. As I stand as Premier with a majority, I will represent New Brunswick in the conferences to come that will determine our place in the Dominion. A strong nation in the North has been a part of my dreams for almost 20 years now, and hopefully, it will be yours as well.

I believe that you are all well aware of the benefits of a united nation, that of increased trades, better defences, and most of all, a great railway that will connect all of the previously separated provinces. Our beloved home is, unfortunately, not the best in terms of financial debt, but a union can bring new trade and work opportunities to a deprived economy. Our trade deal with the Americans had ended and Britain had long resorted to free trade, so the only and best option left to us would be to look around us. We have all of our colonies, each with different wants and fears, which a mutual trade relationship could satisfy. And any commercial union will inevitably lead to some kind of political union, one in which I now support. With the trans-colonial railway, we will have an influx of new cultures and produces, and we may freely travel to a place of our choosing. Our industrial settlements will boom from the construction of the railway and the resultant effects, and New Brunswick can then lift itself up as a powerful and responsible province.

The recent Fenian raids on the Indian Island may have hit most of you as an alarming call to get our defences up. For those who are blissfully ignorant, the civil war has just ended in the South, and the States are eying us with pity and dominance. Their “Manifest Destiny” threatens to annex our lands. Fenians are small threats compared to the armies of the Union States, and Great Britain is unable to defend us over such great a border. Only the combined power and statue of a united Canada can stop us from being robbed of our beliefs and cultures. United, we are stronger than any single province fighting on its own. It is necessary, therefore, to bind together the Atlantic and Pacific by a continuous chain of settlements and line of communications, for that was the destiny of this country and the race which inhabited it.

I had owned a pharmacy and I know firsthand the needs of the people and the province. I promise to fight for financial security and the great railway with all of my power. You need not worry about the position of New Brunswick in the new union, as I myself am a loyal citizen of this great province. I have and will advocate for strong provincial governments and equitable distribution of federal money, and the rights and autonomy of the citizens. You know me as one who speaks with logic and numbers, and I will not fail you in ensuring Maritime rights. Our independence is inevitable and nodded on by Her Majesty Queen Victoria, and it will only serve to strengthen our relationship with the Great Empire as more of a friend and less of a servant. Therefore, support me and my government, and we will build a strong country together.

I will soon depart for London to negotiate the terms for the first great country to be on this land, one proclaimed to be “inhabited by barbarians, bears and beavers” only, and in a few months time, we might finally call ourselves with the proudness of one belonging to a free and mighty nation – Canadians. Once again, I wish to thank you deeply for your support, and I will continue to uphold a responsible government serving its people.

 

Yours sincerely,

S. L. Tilley

1866

“He shall have Dominion also from sea to sea, and from the river unto the ends of the earth.” -Psalms 72:8


Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley.” Encyclopedia of World Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. 7 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

Wallace, C. M. “Biography – TILLEY, Sir SAMUEL LEONARD – Volume XII (1891-1900) – Dictionary of Canadian Biography.” Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Vol. 12, University of Toronto/Université Laval, 1990, www.biographi.ca/en/bio/tilley_samuel_leonard_12E.html.

“Quebec History.” Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley Father of Confederation, Marianopolis College, faculty.marianopolis.edu/c.belanger/quebechistory/encyclopedia/SirSamuelLeonardTilley-CanadianHistory.htm.

 

ON Sir JAM’s Public Affairs

Canada’s first prime minister Sir John A. Macdonald once remarked, “let us be English or let us be French . . . and above all let us be Canadians,” leading the two opposing cultures to unite as Canada.  John A. Macdonald’s efforts in bonding the North and giving birth to the Confederation has long granted him a place as one of the greatest prime ministers in Canada, but recent reformations and value changes sheds light on his not-so-great acts. Many critics urged for the removal of his figure and likeness from the public sphere, but due to his lasting positive influence and the remembrance of our past through statues, I firmly believe that John A. Macdonald’s name should remain in the public sphere.

Throughout the history of mankind, many notable people have come and past, their best ideas and contributions engraved in our brains and our society, and Macdonald is one of those visionaries and missionaries. There can be no denial of his part in founding Canada, from solidifying the notion of two official languages, to building and expanding the confederations, Macdonald is someone who deserves to go remembered. Macdonald believed that “[Canada is] a great country and shall become one of the greatest in the universe if we preserve it; [but] we shall sink into insignificance and adversity if we suffer it to be broken,” and held on to his beliefs with the National Policy to insist on a independent and free Canada, even while many are leaving for the US. It is safe to say that without him, Canada would not be the Canada today. The good that he did are irreplaceable by any other person from his era, but his mistakes are common in almost every other political opponent. Macdonald deserves to be remembered by not just those who can afford to learn history in the private sphere, but everyone who have the right to walk the streets. Removing his name and figure not only removes his contributions, but also an opportunity to connect with the past.

 

 

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/economic-canadian-american-relations/

Document of Learning 1: Postnationalism

“There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada. Those qualities are what make us the first postnational state.”

-Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (2015)

  1. Choose an event from Canada’s past or present (social, political, environmental, or economic) and describe/illustrate (show cause and effect) how this event influenced / influences all four of the quadrants. Provide images / primary source evidence where possible.
  2. Does your event represent a step towards creating and maintaining a coherent Canadian identity, or does it move Canada more clearly in the direction of Trudeau’s discussion of a “postnational” state?
  3. In your opinion, is there any value in trying to define a specific Canadian identity, or should we abandon this idea towards a more open and global idea of nationhood? Why?

 

One of the key events that has shaped Canadian identity and affects all aspects of our lives is the right to universal health care. Tommy Douglas (NDP) first proposed it as premier of Saskatchewan in 1947, urging for free basic hospital care. All of the provinces and territories soon followed, helping Canadians across the country live without fear of health issues regardless of their wealth. The medical program soon expanded and improved to include more treatments covered, leading to the Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services Act in 1957 and the Medical Care Act in 1966. This is a political event, but its far-reaching consequences are definitely affecting all four quadrants. This decision definitely affected the social aspect of Canadians, helping equalize people to make sure they have the same access to important social services. It is also an important step forward in making Canada the accepting, unbiased nation that it is now. It is a statement made by the government that symbolizes their determination to support all their citizens and provide them with the same fundamental rights regardless of poverty or social standing. On the economical side, the government’s decision to “reimburse, or cost share,

one-half of provincial and territorial costs for specified hospital and diagnostic services” will have an impact on the other expenses of the country. The free medical services are, after all, not cheap, knowing that the average household pays $11,320 per year in tax money. The money spent on providing care may be withdrawn from important funds, like ones set up for the environment. The Conservative party is not known for renewable energy and the like, so the health care funds may reduce environmental funding not supported by the government. Also, the fact that people won’t have to pay for healthcare will mean that a lot more people will use the system, increasing strain on the system and usage of medical supplies, creating more waste that may harm the environment.

This act has moved Canada closer as a nation by emphasizing to the world the values that Canadians are proud of. Even today, free universal health care is not the case in many countries in the world, and the fact that Canada is part of this group says something about our stand regarding human rights. From the women’s rights movements in 1929 to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982, Canada has shown itself to be a nation that embraces change to accept all races, genders or social classes. Canada’s decision to spend valuable funds on the universal health care system to provide access to a healthy life for everyone states its priorities to the world. At that time, not many countries would use big sums of money to help the poor, but we did, and that action at the time made millions of Canadians proud. It is actions like this, ones which distinguish Canada from the rest, that shapes Canadian identity, and I believe that everyone, whether then or now, would see us Canadians as open and tolerant people.

I firmly believe that we, as Canadians, should have a collective identity that overarches on the sea of different values and beliefs. It is only through this sense of being “Canadian” that we could be united as a nation and a country. Canadians in this country may have distinct values and beliefs, but just like how Americans are united by the idea of “freedom and ideas”, we should be people drawn together by something as well. This something, I think, is the strive for equality. As a nation, the Canadian identity is gender equality (LGBTQ + as well), immigration and refugee help, First Nations support, and multiculturalism. Regardless of whether the government is doing well to actualize those things, they are the things that Canadians care about and believe in. This is what makes Canada the nations that it is, huge ideas that support and protect the multitude of small, individual ideas, knowing that our differences can’t break us, but only unite us.

Socials Final!

Socials is over, and how fast time flies by when you are having fun… To give you more of a visual, I have included notes in my PowerPoint that I presented in class on Wednesday. So when you click on the link, just click on notes on the bottom right hand corner and you will see an explanation of each slide, which is also kind of my script for the presentation, altered a bit.

Some helpful links you may find helpful in additional:

My Midterm blog post

Socials 9 learning outcomes

pdf of powerpoint without notes

if the PowerPoint link don’t work, click this pdf notes-and-ppt

 

MY FINAL WORDS ON YOUR REVOLUTION

Refer to this page if you are confused as to why I am speaking weirdly. – Tony


 

During my long life as a philosopher, writer and playwright, I have stood on the far edge of human thinkers with my ingenious ideas. I wrote about the ideal world, with more reason behind our actions, less tradition like religion. Other countries respected me, trusted me for my work against tyranny, bigotry and cruelty, but France, you have always been hesitant. Looking back at this whole “revolution”, I see that you have strayed from the right path. Look at what that guy Robespierre did, committing murder in the name of public safety. And guess why he did that, gee, I wonder if that’s because he is hugely influenced by that creature named Rousseau? In any case, if you, had listened, all of this bloodshed and savagery could not have happened, and the misery you had forced upon your people would be lesser.        – Voltaire, past revolution

Learning Centre, more like 10 hours of work on…

Hello, welcome to my learning centre post. Yeah.

I got the idea for my poster like the day before NoN. Before, I planned on using a piece of green paper to write stuff, but then I thought about the tree on the Academy’s logo and the tree of learning. I then thought, for some reason, why don’t I tape letter sized paper together to make a tree shape!. And it went like that. img_1557

OK, for the Eminent Person Study Project, I would say that I made tons of mistakes because first, I thought a wall besides two food tables would be a great spot, turned out that it is completely a wrong decision. Once I got started I realized that I can’t do much there, especially with my “limited” imagination. I was even more surprised when hardly any came to my station. I would have thought that being besides food make people come, but I guess no, being in the back alley is just that lonely. I got my interview after I wrote my speech, which is both my fault and her fault. She replied 11 days after I sent her the email! And then, there were five emails back and forth with 0-4 days in between.

Something that I would do next time would be to send more interview emails, as I got my interview after my speech and it was “somewhat” helpful. In addition I should have looked at the learning centres of past TALONS students to gain more understanding of what Night of the Notables is about, and get ideas for my learning centre as well.

Learning centre plan

Learning centre plan

Still, I felt like I had achieved my goals for this project. I got to know my person better, and most of all, I got to know more of his ideas, his approach to obstacles, why he stood out for a change and his “eminence”. Through this I learned not just about him, but insights and approaches that I could use my own life as well.

Finally, Night of the Notables was an amazing experience for me, particularly because this is the first time that I’ve participated in this kind of event. In the end I want to thank everyone for their contributions in making this NoN so memorable for me and others! This is especially for Ms. Mulder (for being so organized with tons of things and giving out pointers), Mr. Jackson (for giving us lots of class blog time with help and delivering the unforgettable first speech to NoN), Mr. Salisbury (for cheering us on and playing music to loosen everyone’s nerves) and Ms. Dingle (for giving us time to write speeches and teaching us how to)!

GIF courtesy of giphy.com

Goodbye Eminent 2k16, Grade 9’s first and Grade 10’s last NoN!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Written Word

The written word has always been a way for anyone to show their opinions to the world and throughout history has changed. The first real attempts at writing were small images or markings to represent sounds or things. However from that point it has expanded exponentially to the point where anyone (such as myself) can post my thoughts and ideas on the internet for the entire world to see with minimal effort. Now in the last millennium or so a book has been the go to source for good writing.

Now my class was lucky enough to go on a field trip to Macleod’s bookstore and the Vancouver public library.  The library was truly stunning. Many levels of books books and more books made it difficult to find anything specific but thanks to computers used to search the library I was able to pinpoint the location where some relevant books should have been. Unfortunately there were housed in compact shelving and therefore i could not retrieve it without assistance. It was difficult to find someone who could access the shelving but I was thankful when I found someone that could. Just to make things annoying the book was not there so unfortunately I did not retrieve any books on Elvis Presley.                                                                                  Macleod’s bookstore was surreal. It is also the true embodiment of the saying “controlled chaos”.  Books thrown everywhere on the floor on the shelves and some even laid simply in piles or strewn against walls. Now while it is basically anarchy inside there is a sense of calm and beauty with the way things work. As always just being surrounded by books makes one feel that they should be quiet and calm as much as they might want to do otherwise. The smell of old books calms the nerves and makes one feel at home with their surroundings. Now as nice as all that is I was (thankfully) able to find a book that appears quite interesting called “The Serpent And The Rainbow”. Thus far it has been about one scientist who is trying to figure out Haitian zombie’s and how they work. To the point at which I have reached it is a compelling story that has asked some big questions which are difficult if at all possible to answer.

So in the end it was great day looking at the written word and how it has affected the world.