Canada – A country, nation, or postnational state?

 

Canada is a nation united by the very fact that we are diverse and multicultural. Prime Minister Trudeau states that ‘there is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada’’ and tells us that this makes us a postnational state. On the contrary, the fact that we are diverse and multicultural does not take away from our identity, but is rather one of the core values that lie in the centre of our identity as Canadians. The mainstream in Canada is being diverse and multicultural, which unites Canada as a nation. Yes, is undeniable that Canada is a country, “Canada has borders, where guards check passports, and an army” and we are recognized internationally. But Canada is also recognized as a nation that has shared values, not a postnational state. In Canada, “our government believes in the value of immigration, as does the majority of the population” which influences our country to bring in more immigrants, which only reaffirms the core value and identity that Canadians share, of multiculturalism, acceptance, and diversity. These values, this piece of Canadian identity, piece of the Canadian mainstream is not only recognized by us Canadians, but internationally as well. “The world needs more Canada” is a statement made by previous U.S president Barack Obama in regards to our stance on immigration, a stance that is fueled by the shared value of acceptance and diversity that Canadians hold. Michael McDonald tells us that living in Canada is like being part of a family, that “some are born into the family and others are adopted. There is a shared family history — interpreted in diverse ways”. This brings us another view of being Canadian that represents the Canadian identity, which is one of a family. If we look back into the past, historically, families banded together, often united under a crest or symbol that represented the family and their values. Canada is very similar to a family in that sense. Each person in the family is unique, but in the end we Canadians share core values that make us a nation.

R+J Critical Response Act II – Puppy Love?

Based on our reading so far, do you agree or disagree that Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is one of “infatuated children’ engaging in ‘puppy love’? Why or why not? Provide at least two pieces of textual evidence.

Puppy love is defined as a “romantic love that a young person feels for someone else, which usually disappears as the young person grows older” and infatuation is defined as “strong, but not usually lasting feelings of love or attraction”, according to the Cambridge Dictionary. Don’t these descriptions sound familiar? Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is one of infatuated children and puppy love. We’ve seen Romeo throw away his intense love for Rosaline, for the favour of Juliet, in a blink of an eye. Friar Laurence reacts to this in shock, saying “Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! Is Rosaline, that thou didst love so dear, So soon forsaken?” (II. iii. 65-67). Friar Laurence has seen Romeo’s desperation over Rosaline. This line shows he is shocked by the speed and finality that Romeo displays while throwing away his so-called dedication to Rosaline. This was infatuation. Intriguingly, Friar Laurence compares Romeo’s love for Juliet to an explosion, telling him that “violent delights have violent ends, and in their triumph die, like fire and powder, which as they kiss, consume” (II. vi. 9-11).  As we’ve defined, infatuation is a strong love that burns out quickly, almost like an explosion, as Friar Laurence has mentioned. This is another sign that, at the moment, Romeo’s love for Juliet is nothing but infatuation. In addition, Juliet is thirteen. As mentioned, puppy love involves a young person and Juliet is a perfect example; she is a young person in love. Even while she is considered an adult in her society, it is evident that she does not have a thorough experience and understanding of love. She tells Romeo her “true love is grown to such excess [she] cannot sum up sum of half [her] wealth” (II. vi. 33-34). Not even two days have passed since they have met, and Juliet is saying that her love for Romeo is so large that she cannot count half of it. Juliet doesn’t seem to be aware of the honeymoon phase and doesn’t understand the gravity of the consequences that might follow from her reckless actions. This reminds us that Juliet is, mentally, still a child and that she is naive and inexperienced with love. Romeo shows signs of infatuation with Juliet and Juliet shows signs of puppy love. In addition, Juliet is still a child mentally and Romeo, even while he is considered an adult, is still a young person. Their relationship perfectly fits the description of infatuated children playing with puppy love.

To what extent is Kulich’s argument that Romeo and Juliet should not be viewed as children effective, or even historically accurate? Do some brief online research to back up your claim, providing links/citation to your research at the end of your response.

What makes an adult, an adult? Is it the mind, wisdom, or the expectations of society? Kulich argues that Romeo and Juliet are considered adults in their time and that they are not infatuated children playing with puppy love. Historically, Kulich is correct. In the Elizabethan era (1500’s-1600’s), children were recognized as adults around the age of 12 or 13. Women were permitted to marry at the age of 12 and men were able to marry by the age of 14. We know that Juliet is 13 and that Romeo is in his late teens or early twenties. However, most women, in that time, did not marry at such a young age. Only the children of the wealthy married so young; most women typically married in their mid-twenties. Juliet is on the younger side of this spectrum. Unlike the majority of women, who were able to fall in love, fall out of love, and court, Juliet was not given the chance to gain the knowledge that comes from experiencing these things. This means that mentally and emotionally, Juliet is quite naive and childlike. She has no idea what love is supposed to be like, how the process of falling in love and falling out of love works. However, she confidently declares that her love for Romeo is “as boundless as the sea” and compares her love to the ocean, saying that “both are infinite” (II. ii. 133/135). This displays Juliet’s naivety and childlike confidence that her love will remain constant, passionate for evermore. Juliet is infatuated with Romeo and is ignoring the possibility of falling out love or is simply unaware of this possibility, due to her lack of experience in the area of romance. Whereas an adult might stop and think about the consequences, whilst taking knowledge from their past experiences, Juliet is throwing herself into a marriage with no prior knowledge and without thinking of the consequences. This shows the mindset of a child, rather than an adult. Kulich was correct in the fact that Romeo and Juliet were considered adults in their time. However, mentally and emotionally, Romeo and Juliet’s relationship resembles one of infatuated children and puppy love.

 

https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/z2wp34j/revision/3

https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/marriage-and-courtship

http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-marriages-and-weddings.htm

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/infatuation

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/puppy-love

R+J Critical Response Act II – Puppy Love?

Based on our reading so far, do you agree or disagree that Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is one of “infatuated children’ engaging in ‘puppy love’? Why or why not? Provide at least two pieces of textual evidence.

 

I agree that Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is one of infatuated children and puppy love. We can see this during several instances throughout the play. We see Romeo throw away his infatuation for Rosaline, for the favour of Juliet, in a blink of an eye. Friar Laurence reacts to this in shock, saying “Holy Saint Francis, what a change is here! Is Rosaline, that thou didst love so dear, So soon forsaken?” (II. iii. 65-67). Friar Laurence is someone who knows Romeo well and has seen Romeo pining over Rosaline. He’s shocked by the speed and finality that Romeo displays while throwing away his infatuation for Rosaline. This proves that Romeo is immature and in puppy love. If one was in love with someone, it would take an extended amount of time to get over that person, but Romeo forgets about Rosaline in the moment he sets eyes on Juliet. Juliet is not even fourteen yet and even while she is considered an adult in her society, it is evident that she does not have a thorough experience and understanding of love. She tells Romeo her “true love is grown to such excess [she] cannot sum up sum of half [her] wealth” (II. vi. 33-34). Not even two days have passed since they have met, and Juliet is saying that her love for Romeo is so large that she cannot count even half of it. This reminds us of Juliet’s naivety and inexperience in love. Juliet doesn’t seem to be aware of the honeymoon phase and doesn’t understand the gravity of the consequences that might follow from her reckless actions. Romeo’s immaturity and Juliet’s naivety supports the opinion that their relationship is one of infatuated children and puppy love.

To what extent is Kulich’s argument that Romeo and Juliet should not be viewed as children effective, or even historically accurate? Do some brief online research to back up your claim, providing links/citation to your research at the end of your response.

 

What makes an adult, an adult? Is it the mind, wisdom, or the expectations of society? Kulich argues that Romeo and Juliet are considered adults in their time and are not infatuated children playing with puppy love. Historically, Kulich is correct. In the Elizabethan era (1500’s-1600’s), children were recognized as adults around the age of 12 or 13. Women were permitted to marry at the age of 12 and men were able to marry by the age of 14. We know that Juliet is 13 and that Romeo is in his late teens or early twenties. However, most women did not marry at such a young age. Only the children of the wealthy married so young; most women typically married in their mid-twenties. Juliet is on the younger side of this spectrum. Unlike most women, who were able to fall in love, fall out of love, and court another, Juliet lacks the knowledge that comes from experiencing these things. This means that mentally and emotionally, Juliet is quite naive and childlike. She has no idea what love is supposed to be like, how the process of falling in love and falling out of love works. However, she confidently declares that her love for Romeo is “as boundless as the sea” and compares her love to the ocean, saying that “both are infinite” (II. ii. 133/135). This displays Juliet’s naivety and childlike confidence that her love will remain constant, passionate for evermore. Juliet is infatuated with Romeo and is ignoring the possibility of falling out love or is simply unaware of this possibility, due to her lack of experience in the area of romance. Whereas an adult might stop and think about the consequences, whilst taking knowledge from their past experiences, Juliet is throwing herself into a marriage with no prior knowledge and without thinking of the consequences. This shows the mindset of a child, rather than an adult. Kulich was correct in the fact that Romeo and Juliet were considered adults in their time. However, mentally and emotionally, Romeo and Juliet’s relationship resembles one of infatuated children and puppy love.

 

https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/z2wp34j/revision/3

https://www.bl.uk/shakespeare/articles/marriage-and-courtship

http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/elizabethan-marriages-and-weddings.htm

Zip #5 – Reading Break

As you may know, my inquiry question is: what components make a fictional world vivid and realistic? My question has remained constant over this year’s Zip and I chose to do this question as an extension of my question last year, which focused on creating fictional characters. I wanted to continue learning about what it takes to be a fiction writer and create something of my own! I’ve gained a multitude of skills this year. I’ve learned to limit my research so I don’t focus too much on one component over another. I’ve practiced looking at our world and picking out components that are crucial to making our world go round. I’ve practiced taking notes and writing vivid short stories. All of these skills are things I will continue to develop throughout my high school and even post-secondary career.

The answer to my Zip question is subjective. Creating a fictional world is different for everyone! Yes, there are components that everyone needs to consider, like setting and the laws of physics, but most things are up to the imagination of the creator. For my fictional world, I’ve found that a few components that are absolutely crucial are physical terrain, the basic function of society, history, technology, and a magic system, if one chooses to create one. I decided to focus on technology, society, creating a magic system, and a little bit of history. My artifact is a short collection of 3 short stories. These short stories show the life of three different people going throughout their lives in my fictional world. I focused on showing social views and the way ‘magic’ is incorporated into this society. This artifact connects to my 3 chosen curricular competencies, which are:

  • Use writing and designing processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful texts for a variety of purposes and audiences.
  • Transform ideas and information to create original texts.
  • Construct meaningful personal connections between self, text, and world.

The three short stories I wrote have all come from a planning and designing process that goes back to the very beginning of ZIP. I first had to design a fictional world and imagine the life of someone living in this fiction world then turn these thoughts into an engaging story, which meets the competency of ‘using writing and designing processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful texts’ and ‘transforming ideas and information into creating original texts’. A lot of my stories focus on the day to day lives of people in my world, which really don’t differ all that much from the lives of people today. I took inspiration from today’s world and combined it with my imagination and research to create my own fictional world, which satisfies the competency of ‘constructing meaningful personal connections between self, text, and world’. Here’s an excerpt from one of my stories!

—-

Walking out the doors of his work office, he pauses, soaking in the soft spring sunlight. He’s done for the day. No more reports, proposals, or meetings until after the weekend. Walking down the street lined with flowers and trees, he enters his favourite coffee shop. He gives the familiar man at the counter a smile. A few minutes later, he exits the shop with a cup of tea in hand. He takes a sip. Chamomile. The coffee shop famous for giving the right drinks at the right times, due to their employees who have abilities to sense emotions and thoughts; they didn’t give him coffee this time. His exhaustion must be his primary emotion if he’s been given tea for the first time. Sleep is his top priority now.

—-

Here are a few links that came in useful during my research/planning stage!

https://writersedit.com/fiction-writing/the-ultimate-guide-to-world-building-how-to-write-fantasy-sci-fi-and-real-life-worlds/

This link leads you to a guide for creating any kind of world. It goes into writing about/creating alternate worlds, imaginary worlds, and real locations. There are sections on different aspects to keep in mind as well, like gaining inspiration from real world comparisons and looking into plausible what if scenarios.

https://www.nownovel.com/blog/how-to-create-a-fantasy-world/

This link leads to a website that gives you concrete steps. For example, step 1 here is creating the physical lie of the land. I didn’t follow these steps, but the steps showed which components are crucial to a fictional world.

https://www.well-storied.com/blog/how-to-create-a-magic-system-in-six-simple-steps

This link only focuses on creating a magic system. It goes into detail and gives examples of things to consider. I found this website very helpful, because one of the core ideas my world revolves around is magic. This helped me get started with a few ideas!

https://brandonsanderson.com/sandersons-first-law/

This website has three different posts regarding magic systems. Each blog post goes in depth about different components of a magic system. For example, the first blog post covers the difference between soft and hard magic systems, and tells you a little bit of the pros and cons of each.

 

New questions I have about my ZIP are:

  • How do writers use details of their world to add to plot points in novels?
  • When creating an extensive history of your world, what are some ‘eras’ that may be present?
  • How might abilities affect the lives of certain individuals?

As I’m interested in (possibly) writing a novel, it makes me very excited to even think about these questions. The idea of making something of my own where stories and lives of people unfold is exhilarating!

ZIP is coming to a close and I’m a bit sad to see it go. This will be my last ZIP… I think I’ve made it a good one!

ZIP #4 – Struggles

Describe the ups and downs you have encountered to date in your inquiry. Specifically, when you were frustrated or struggling in your inquiry, what did you do to address the situation?

My ZIP inquiry is: what components make a fictional world vivid and realistic? As I come to realize over time, creating a fictional world is subjective. Yes, there are components that everyone needs to consider, such as society and geography, but what you do with those components is entirely up to the individual. While attempting to think up of ideas to put into my fictional world, I struggle with the overflow of ideas. There’s too many ways I can make a society or create a magic system. I can create a magic system where everyone has an ability or one where only a few people do. There’s so many fun ways to create a fictional world! Too many ways. After struggling to choose a single idea or concept, the realization that I might not finish on time comes into view. I need to make decisions now. It’s okay to adjust and redesign my world, but I first need to make a decision. After opening my eyes to this problem, I find it much easier to simply choose the idea I like best at the moment, knowing that I can always go back to alter it another time.

ZIP #2 – Resources

What is a specific source of information that you have found valuable in answering your inquiry question? How has it proved valuable? Explain.

 

https://www.well-storied.com/blog/how-to-create-a-magic-system-in-six-simple-steps

Six steps to creating a general magic system.

 

https://brandonsanderson.com/sandersons-first-law/

https://brandonsanderson.com/sandersons-second-law/

https://brandonsanderson.com/sandersons-third-law-of-magic/

3 laws to keep in mind when building a magic system.

 

I’ve found an ocean of resources, but the ones you see above are the ones I am focusing on for now. In my previous blog post, I’ve mentioned that I needed a starting point. I’ve decided that a central part of the world I create will be it’s magic system, so creating a magic system will be my starting point! The first resource gives me a really broad overview and lists some simple, but important questions about my magic system. It’s really useful in it’s concision, because I have to create a lot of things besides the magic system. I need a social structure, countries, and other things on top of my magic system, so it really helps that it’s not too detailed.

The other resource(s) are part of a collection, so there’s three different parts. This resource is really helpful because it goes into depth and gives a lot of details and explanations. It lists things that are crucial to know and clearly explains what it means step by step. It also helps that this comes from an author, someone who’s gone through this process. Hopefully I will be able to design a consistent framework for my world’s magic system!

Wizard of Earthsea – Disagree

Light and darkness are easy to identify in the world.

 

Not everything is as simple as it seems. That cute looking kid? Could be the most troublesome child ever. That calm and composed straight A student? Might be the biggest mess. You never know what lies beneath the surface. Assuming that we have defined light and darkness as good and bad, it is not easy to identify what is good and what is bad. If a girl murdered a man, most people would be quick to say that she’s a bad person, and that her actions are full of darkness. But what if this man had been harassing her or attempting to hurt her, perhaps even assault her? Did the girl do something bad by defending herself? Is the act of defending oneself full of darkness? No. Like this example, many things in the world are not simply light or dark. Most actions are a mixture, a portrait made of white, black, and every shade in between. Someone with good intentions might do a bad deed. Someone with bad intentions might do a good deed. Is it easy to identify the actions of the girl, who committed a murder while trying to defend herself, as good or bad? No. Not everything is as simple as it seems.

Harrison Bergeron

In your opinion, what is the most effective medium for telling the “Harrison Bergeron” narrative: film or text? Why?

Books have been around for hundreds of years, while films are a much newer medium of sharing stories. 2081 creates a much stronger impact than “Harrison Bergeron”, as 2081 offers more background information and is more relatable. 2081 by Chandler Tuttle is the film adaptation of the short story “Harrison Bergeron”, written by Kurt Vonnegut in 1961. “Harrison Bergeron” is set in 2081, in a world where everything and everyone is equal. This equality has been achieved with the use of mental and physical handicaps for the intelligent and the strong. The story centers around Harrison Bergeron, a genius and athlete, and his actions after he breaks out of prison. There are subtle differences between the two plots, as the story progresses. 2081 has more background information and context compared to “Harrison Bergeron”. In “Harrison Bergeron”, the only background information we get is that “the year [is] 2081, and everyone [is] finally equal” (1). Compared to 2081, where we see glimpses of the government and people living their daily lives, it’s a lot harder to infer things about the current society in the story, and thus makes it difficult to understand what is going on. With better understanding of a society, it’s easier to make connections from another society to ours, which makes 2081 more realistic and relatable when compared to ‘Harrison Bergeron”. In “Harrison Bergeron’ we only get a glimpse of people other than Hazel and George when they “were watching television” (1). In 2081, we get more chances to witness their society. We see people watching the ballet, ballerinas, the military, and many other people living in their society. We see people like us, living in a society that has many differences, but also many similarities to ours. With these similarities, it’s easier to see ourselves in the position of people living in the story, which makes 2081 more vivid and impactful compared to “Harrison Bergeron”.

Danger of the Single Story

 

How might we begin to reject the single stories in our life?

In our daily lives, we see representations of different cultures, environments, objects, and people all the time. What we don’t always realize is that these representations can influence our perspective, limiting us to see only one colour out of a thousand. In order to reject the single stories in our lives, we have to keep our minds open and be aware that what we may hear, may not be the only truth. We learn from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED talk that “power is the ability not just to tell the story of another person, but to make it the definitive story of that person”. We hear of her story in America, where her roommate expects that she “did not know how to use a stove.” Her roommate had only heard ” a single story of Africa: a single story of catastrophe” and came to believe what she was told, never assuming that there could be more to the truth. Believing only what we hear can leave us with a lack of knowledge, affecting our judgment to make the best decisions. Mastering the ability to question what you are told will give you power over yourself, overriding the power that people in influential positions wield over us. In order to keep our minds open and aware, we have to question if what we are told is the entire truth. Like we have discussed in class last year, we must ask the question of who; who benefits from sharing this single story? Understanding that there is always more to the truth and questioning who benefits will help us see things from a broader perspective.

Flame in the Mist – Scene 1

Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh

 

In a traditional Japanese society, women are expected to be proper and obedient, like fragile objects that are traded around by men. Mariko defies all those expectations in the first scene that I chose, where she kills a man. At first, I was disappointed in Mariko’s inability to fight back. It was expected, as she was probably sheltered from combat experiences as a woman, but it was aggravating to read about a woman unable to defend herself from an aggressor. However, I was astonished by Mariko’s quick thinking and the way she doesn’t hesitate to kill the nameless man. During her struggle with the man, Mariko decides that she will “not be bandied about by men any longer” and that she is “not a prize to be bought or sold” (31). Mariko fears being continuously oppressed by men and wants to be in control of her own fate. Mariko’s external struggle against the man is accompanied by her internal conflict regarding whether she should or should not break free of her society’s expectations of women. After the man is dead, Mariko proceeds to throw up, which I found to be realistic; killing someone is bound to be a shocking experience for anyone. Mariko’s unwavering spirit is a characteristic that I admire and wish that I could develop. It was difficult to make a personal connection to Mariko in this scene, as I have not killed anyone before, but if I was put in the same situation as her, I feel as if I would have had a harder time fighting back. Ending someone’s life may be a decision I might struggle to make, and my hesitance may cost me my life.